Twitter appeals order to hand over protester data

Twitter says it is appealing a court ruling ordering it to turn over data on a user involved in Occupy Wall Street
Twitter said Thursday it was appealing a court ruling ordering it to turn over data on one of its users involved in the Occupy Wall Street protest movement.

Twitter said Thursday it was appealing a court ruling ordering it to turn over data on one of its users involved in the Occupy Wall Street protest movement.

In a case watched closely as a test of online , Twitter's attorney Benjamin Lee said in a tweet: "We're appealing the Harris decision. It doesn't strike the right balance between the rights of users and the interests of law enforcement."

The announcement came weeks after Manhattan criminal court Judge Matthew Sciarrino ruled that law enforcement had the right to see tweets and other user data from Malcolm Harris, who is being prosecuted for disorderly conduct in connection with an Occupy protest on the Brooklyn Bridge last year.

The judge said that the tweets are not private information and thus not subject to the constitutional guarantee of privacy.

"If you post a , just like if you scream it out the window, there is no reasonable expectation of privacy," he said in an 11-page ruling.

The and others have cited the case as a test of online. The ACLU said it hopes the decision is eventually overturned.


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Citation: Twitter appeals order to hand over protester data (2012, July 19) retrieved 23 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-twitter-appeals-protester.html
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Jul 30, 2012
If its like screaming out a window, then why do they need to issue a court order to find out who sent it?

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