Sexual healing? Not likely

Sexual healing? Not likely
Dr Damian Dowling

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new study shows the production of sperm is more biologically taxing than previously thought, and expending energy on it has significant health implications.

In research published in , Dr Damian Dowling of Monash University's School of Biological Sciences and Professor Leigh Simmons of the University of Western Australia have investigated the trade-off between sperm quality and immunity.

The researchers used the Australian cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus to prove that the production of quality sperm is expensive and males are strategic about investing energy in the .

Dr Dowling said investigations into life history trade-offs - investment in reproduction versus future reproduction and survival prospects - have historically focused on females.

"This study challenges the traditional view that sex, and sperm production, come cheaply to males. It is typically thought that females must invest heavily into reproduction, whereas males can freely produce millions of high-quality, tiny sperm on demand, with few costs," Dr Dowling said.

"Here we show that the costs are in fact large, and these costs dictate how much effort a male will devote into any given ."

The were housed either with sexually immature females, sexually mature females incapable of reproduction, or sexually mature females capable of reproduction. Sperm quality was measured twice and immune function once during the experiment.

Dr Dowling said the male crickets were more likely to produce high quality sperm when housed with sexually mature females with whom they could mate, indicating a strategic investment of energy.

The researchers also found that production of quality sperm appeared to have a negative effect on the crickets' immune systems.

"Males that invested heavily in their sperm paid the price of being more likely to succumb to a . And we are not talking about STDs here - we are talking about how increased investment into the quality of the ejaculate corresponds with general reductions in ," Dr Dowling said.


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More information: www.plosone.org/article/info%3 … journal.pone.0030172
Provided by Monash University
Citation: Sexual healing? Not likely (2012, January 30) retrieved 22 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-sexual.html
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Jan 30, 2012
A man climbed a mountain to talk to a lonely wise man that lived atop it.

"Oh wise master, I travelled far to ask you this: why is it that every time I masturbate I get foggy vision?"
to what the old man answered:
"If I knew the answera to that question I would have found my way outta here decades ago!"

Jan 30, 2012
Dr. Dowling looks far too happy for having presented such a depressing paper.

Jan 30, 2012
i knew i had to quit fapping and work out more, i geuss this paper finally persuaded me.

Jan 30, 2012
If this proves anything, it's that fapping IS a workout.

Xbw
Jan 30, 2012
This guy is never going to get laid with a paper like this.

Jan 30, 2012
I love it when they research f**ing crickets (or fruit flies, or whatever) and then generalize the conclusions all the way to humans.

Xbw
Jan 30, 2012
I love it when they research f**ing crickets (or fruit flies, or whatever) and then generalize the conclusions all the way to humans.


It makes sense. Nothing turns me on more than a lady rubbing her legs together and making sweet sweet cricket music with them - based upon the ambient temperature of course.

Jan 31, 2012
It makes sense. Nothing turns me on more than a lady rubbing her legs together and making sweet sweet cricket music with them - based upon the ambient temperature of course.


LOL. Be careful not to reproduce with her too often, or you'll get a runny nose :)

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