China to call for Kyoto extension at climate talks

China has always said that developed nations should take responsibility for climate change
Traffic makes its way through thich haze in Beijing in October. China, the world's top greenhouse gas emitter, said Tuesday it will push at next week's climate talks for an extension of the Kyoto Protocol, which requires rich nations to reduce their emissions.

China, the world's top greenhouse gas emitter, said Tuesday it will push at next week's climate talks for an extension of the Kyoto Protocol, which requires rich nations to reduce their emissions.

Beijing's top climate negotiator Xie Zhenhua also called on wealthy nations to hammer out a funding mechanism to help developing countries implement efforts to address global warming at the Durban meeting.

But he said China would only take on commitments "appropriate to our stage of development", reiterating Beijing's long-held view that poorer countries should not be required to make binding commitments on emissions.

"The emission-reduction plan for in the second commitment period under the should be made clear as soon as possible," Xie told reporters, ahead of next week's UN climate talks in Durban.

The first commitment period expires at the end of 2012.

"Developed nations... must according to the Kyoto Protocol commit to a first commitment period and a second commitment period on reduction targets.

Xie Zhenhua has called on wealthy nations to hammer out a funding mechanism to help developing countries
China, the world's top greenhouse gas emitter, said Tuesday it will push at next week's climate talks for an extension of the Kyoto Protocol, which requires rich nations to reduce their emissions. Beijing's top climate negotiator Xie Zhenhua (seen here in 2009) also called on wealthy nations to hammer out a funding mechanism to help developing countries implement efforts to address global warming.
", after receiving funds and technology, should adopt active amelioration actions."

China has always said that , with their long history of industrialisation, should take responsibility for .

But the lack of binding constraints over giants like China and India and the refusal of the United States to join the protocol has gravely weakened efforts to address the issue, especially after the near collapse of in Copenhagen in 2009.

Canada, Japan and Russia have already refused to sign on for a second commitment period, objecting to the lack of legal constraints on the world's biggest carbon .

Europe says it can accept a continuation, provided China and the US show they are serious about major cuts in the coming years.

"There is a view from the international community that China is the number one emitter of carbon dioxide and its emissions are growing rapidly," Xie said, referring to the main that causes global warming.

"This assessment is correct, China's current emissions of greenhouse gases are very huge, and the increase is very rapid. This is a fact."

Xie said China was doing all it could, and had in 2009 committed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions per unit of gross national product by between 40 and 45 percent by 2020 compared with 2005 emissions.

But he conceded that China's overall emissions would increase during the period to 2020.

"We are adopting active measures to reduce the speed of increase of greenhouse gases in an effort to reach a peak of carbon dioxide emissions at an early date," Xie said.

He refused to predict when China's greenhouse gas emissions would peak.


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Citation: China to call for Kyoto extension at climate talks (2011, November 22) retrieved 19 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-china-kyoto-extension-climate.html
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Nov 23, 2011
China, the world's top greenhouse gas emitter, said Tuesday it will push at next week's climate talks for an extension of the Kyoto Protocol, which requires rich nations to reduce their emissions.


Thanks for this transparent exposure of the usually concealed agenda of AGW: Equalize the standard of living in all parts of a new one-world government.

Many of us are only now starting to grasp that world leaders have an agenda that is independent of the will of their citizens.

http://noconsensu...nt-58188

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
http://myprofile....anuelo09

Nov 25, 2011
I really hope China pushes this because they seem to be the only country that has any power of persuasion over the USofA coal and oil diet. They are the only government that has the capability influence the debate towards use of green and renewable CO2 reducing energy technologies.

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