United pilots to use iPad for navigation

United Airlines pilots will now use iPads in place of flight manuals and chart books
United Airlines said Tuesday it was replacing the hefty flight manuals and chart books its pilots have long used with 11,000 iPads carrying the same data.

United Airlines said Tuesday it was replacing the hefty flight manuals and chart books its pilots have long used with 11,000 iPads carrying the same data.

The 1.5 pound (0.7 kilogram) iPad will take the place of about 38 pounds (17 kilograms) of paper instructions, data and charts pilots have long used to help guide them, parent company United Continental Holdings said.

The popular will carry the Mobile FliteDeck software app from Jeppesen, a Boeing subsidiary which provides navigation tools for air, sea and land.

"The paperless flight deck represents the next generation of flying," said Captain Fred Abbott, United's senior vice president of .

"The introduction of ensures our pilots have essential and real-time information at their fingertips at all times throughout the flight."

It will be supplied to all pilots on United and Continental flights; the two carriers merged in 2010.

United is the second major US carrier to adopt the iPad as a key pilot flight aid.

In May Alaska Airlines also adopted it, after the okayed the iPad for cockpit use.

United estimates that using the iPad will save 16 million sheets of paper a year, and that the lighter load it represents will save 326,000 gallons (1.2 million liters) in fuel.

"With iPad, pilots are able to quickly and efficiently access reference material without having to thumb through thousands of sheets of paper and reduce clutter on the ," the company said.


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Citation: United pilots to use iPad for navigation (2011, August 23) retrieved 14 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-ipad.html
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Aug 23, 2011
Great idea, depend on the i-pad for vital data. They're really tossing the hard copies? As a former pilot and aerospace industry consultant I say this ia an idiotic decision. Nothing wrong with using a tablet for plates, but keep hard copies accessible!

Aug 23, 2011
I agree however if each of the crew has one there is a level of redundancy that offsets the risk a bit. But this is the pilots union pimping for Ipads lets be honest.

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