Large Hadron Collider sets world record beam intensity

Large Hadron Collider
A person stands in front of the huge ATLAS detector, one of six detectors that are part of the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva. Credit: Maximilien Brice, CERN

(PhysOrg.com) -- Around midnight this night CERN's Large Hadron Collider set a new world record for beam intensity at a hadron collider when it collided beams with a luminosity of 4.67 x 1032cm-2s-1. This exceeds the previous world record of 4.024 x 1032cm-2s-1, which was set by the US Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's Tevatron collider in 2010, and marks an important milestone in LHC commissioning.

"Beam intensity is key to the success of the LHC, so this is a very important step," said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. "Higher intensity means more data, and more data means greater discovery potential."

Luminosity gives a measure of how many collisions are happening in a : the higher the luminosity, the more particles are likely to collide. When looking for rare processes, this is important. Higgs particles, for example, will be produced very rarely if they exist at all, so for a conclusive discovery or refutation of their existence, a large amount of data is required.

The current LHC run is scheduled to continue to the end of 2012. That will give the experiments time to collect enough data to fully explore the energy range accessible with 3.5 TeV per beam collisions for new physics before preparing the LHC for higher energy running. By the end of the current running period, for example, we should know whether the exists or not.

"There's a great deal of excitement at CERN today," said CERN's Director for Research and Scientific Computing, Sergio Bertolucci. "and a tangible feeling that we're on the threshold of new discovery."

After two weeks of preparing the LHC for this new level of beam intensity, the machine is now moving in to a phase of continuous physics running scheduled to last until the end of the year. There will then be a short technical stop, before physics running resumes for 2012.


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Large Hadron Collider sets new power world record

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Citation: Large Hadron Collider sets world record beam intensity (2011, April 22) retrieved 16 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-large-hadron-collider-world-intensity.html
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Apr 22, 2011
467 inverse microbarn/s

Apr 22, 2011
So how many watts is it putting into every square centimeter?

Apr 22, 2011
phase of continuous physics running scheduled to last until the end of the year. There will then be a short technical stop, before physics running resumes for 2012.


physics running?

Apr 22, 2011
What I cannot understand is, why it's not possible to build some collider section from glass and show us, how the particle collision appears with naked eye. The collision of beams should create visible sparks in empty space.

Apr 22, 2011
What I cannot understand is, why it's not possible to build some collider section from glass and show us, how the particle collision appears with naked eye. The collision of beams should create visible sparks in empty space.


Ummm...because most people don't want instant death from the radiation?

Apr 22, 2011
Ummm...because most people don't want instant death from the radiation?

Remote cameras could survive it for a moment...

Apr 22, 2011
Possible results are being rumored as well,....

http://www.foxnew...article/

Apr 22, 2011
Ummm...because most people don't want instant death from the radiation?

Remote cameras could survive it for a moment...


The sensors are designed to capture the event which is then converted into a visual image... just as cameras do ;)

Apr 22, 2011
....., (Rumored finding of higs, or something.)

Apr 23, 2011
we should know whether the Higgs boson exists or not.

*** NOT ***

Apr 23, 2011
cool!! ........

Apr 23, 2011
What I cannot understand is, why it's not possible to build some collider section from glass and show us, how the particle collision appears with naked eye. The collision of beams should create visible sparks in empty space.


They are not visible. Sorry to burst your bubble. The issue is that the photons produced are far above the visual range - you can see stuff around 4 eV. The photons produced in the LHC are probably above 1000000 eV.

Apr 24, 2011
The photons produced in the LHC are probably above 1000000 eV
I'm not very sure about it - I think, we are missing some info about collisions in such way. In addition, it's well known, the inner surface of collide tubes is heavily eroded with products of collisions near the places, where beams are intersecting mutually. Their impacts should make visible sparks, too. It has no meaning to speculate about it - we should simply try to have look at it.

Apr 25, 2011
What I cannot understand is, why it's not possible to build some collider section from glass and show us, how the particle collision appears with naked eye. The collision of beams should create visible sparks in empty space.


How interesting would it be to watch your microwave running with nothing in it? Not very interesting. Also, it would take some very thick, strong glass to withstand the barometric pressure acting on it from our atmosphere. The vacuum in the CERN accelerator is more empty than even outer space.

:)

6_6
Apr 25, 2011
nothing more than a fancy toy that belongs in the background of a frankenstien movie.

J-n
Apr 25, 2011
nothing more than a fancy toy that belongs in the background of a frankenstien movie.


Why would you say something like that? Or is it just lack of understanding of how scientific advances work?

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