Hacker scam targets iPad owners: BitDefender

Hackers are sending out email messages that falsely offers a software update for Apple's iPad
A man browses the Internet on his newly purchased iPad on April 3 in Fort Worth, Texas. Software security firm BitDefender warned Tuesday that hackers are trying to trick iPad owners into infecting personal computers with a power-seizing virus.

Software security firm BitDefender warned Tuesday that hackers are trying to trick iPad owners into infecting personal computers with a power-seizing virus.

Hackers are sending out email messages that falsely offers a software update for Apple's freshly launched tablet computers, according to BitDefender.

The messages steer iPad owners to a realistic looking website that supposedly provides the latest version if iTunes online shop but instead installs malicious code on visitors' machines.

"With more than 600,000 iPads sold since its introduction, it's clear as why malware creators have been interested in crashing this promising party," the Romania-based firm said in an online post.

Once installed, the gives hackers a "backdoor" into computers and lets them control the machines, according to BitDefender.

It is standard procedure for to take advantage of hot topics and major news to trick their way past peoples' defenses and into their computers using booby-trapped websites or email messages.

The Wi-Fi-only model of the iPad from the maker of the Macintosh , the iPod and the went on sale in the United States on April 3 and the company sold more than 500,000 units the first week.

An iPad model featuring 3G cellular connectivity is planned to hit stores in the United States on April 30.

The Cupertino, California-based company announced recently that heavy US demand had forced it to delay the international release of the iPad by a month, until late May.


Explore further

3G iPad to hit US stores on April 30: Apple

(c) 2010 AFP

Citation: Hacker scam targets iPad owners: BitDefender (2010, April 27) retrieved 24 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-04-hacker-scam-ipad-owners-bitdefender.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
0 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Apr 27, 2010
Sorry, didn't you guys know? Apple devices can't get viruses! Whooooooops! There goes a selling point.

Apr 27, 2010
It's funny how "unpopular for writing viruses" gets translated by the masses to "immune to viruses". Of course, social engineering has been taking advantage of human ignorance for ages and will continue to do so.

J-n
Apr 27, 2010
The Macintosh OS is not as succecptable to viruses as Windows, but is still no where near as secure as Linux.

As far as portable devices are concerned, i dont think ANY of them have very good protection against malicous code.


Apr 27, 2010
If any of you actually went to bitdefnender and read the release statement you'd see this.

"It is important to say that Mac users remain unaffected by this piece of malware."

This is a scam to get users to download the malware on there windows machines. They couldn't get this on the iPad itself because Apple as to sign each app that the iPhone OS can run unless you jailbreak it.

If any of you want to read/listen to a great summary of the inherit security of the iPhone OS I direct you to Security Now Podcast #245, link below

http://twit.tv/sn245

Apr 28, 2010
Any network is as vulnerable to attack as the end user. If a user does not validate the installation it will most likely not be susceptible. I would not call it a virus, but a phishing attack. When it comes down to it, users must validate the installation of any software. End users such an me or you are at greatest fault in causing OS problems. Anyone wanting to exploit our veanarabilities as humans just present a facade dialog box so we accept credentials to ignore dialog boxes for rights permissions. Being smart as an end user is the key but many users of tech devices today just want it here and now without interruption. Too bad end users reap what they sow :-}.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more