LEDs may help reduce skin wrinkles, researchers report

October 20, 2008,
LEDs may help reduce skin wrinkles, researches report. Credit: American Chemical Society

Researchers in Germany are describing a potential alternative to Botox and cosmetic surgery for easing facial wrinkles. Their study, scheduled for the November 5 issue of ACS' Crystal Growth & Design reports that high intensity visible light from light emitting diodes (LEDs) applied daily for several weeks resulted in "rejuvenated skin, reduced wrinkle levels, juvenile complexion and lasting resilience." LEDs are the miniature lights used in an array of products, from TV remote controls to traffic lights.

In the study, Andrei P. Sommer and Dan Zhu point out that high-intensity visible light has been used in medicine for more than 40 years to speed healing of wounds. That light actually penetrates into the skin, causing changes in the sub-surface tissue. Until now, however, scientists have not known the physicochemical nature of those changes.

They report identifying how the visible light works — by changing the molecular structure of a glue-like layer of water on elastin, the protein that provides elasticity in skin, blood vessels, heart and other body structures.

Figuratively speaking, the light strips away those water molecules that are involved in the immobilization of elastin, gradually restoring its elastic function and thus reducing facial wrinkles. "We are justified in believing that our approach can be easily converted to deep body rejuvenation programs," the researchers state.

Article: "From Microtornadoes to Facial Rejuvenation: Implication of Interfacial Water Layers", dx.doi.org/10.1021/cg8000703

Source: American Chemical Society

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barakn
3 / 5 (6) Oct 20, 2008
I love it when they take before and after photos using different lighting conditions so you can't actually tell what's going on. It boosts my confidence in their findings.
h0dges
5 / 5 (2) Oct 20, 2008
My thoughts exactly.
deatopmg
not rated yet Oct 21, 2008
Interesting paper and the first in 45 yrs I've ever seen FREE from the ACS. There must be some mistake.

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