European Union eyes better small aircraft

February 5, 2007

A $548,000 (280,000 pound) grant to engineers at Britain's University of Manchester could lead to cheaper, lighter and "greener" small passenger aircraft.

A team from the university's Power Conversion Group will use the European Union grant to investigate how current mechanical and hydraulic systems on small aircraft, such as private jets and those used for short flights, can be improved using more advanced electrical engineering.

The research is part of the EU's Cost Effective Small Aircraft project, which involves 35 commercial and academic organizations.

All aspects of aircraft design and development will be examined during the EU-funded project, with the ultimate aim to produce a new concept for aircraft with between 10 and 50 seats.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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