In Brief: Mobile TV demand seen reaching 24 M by 2010

July 25, 2006

About 24 million people will be watching TV or video on their mobile phones by 2010, up from 7 million this year, a research group said Tuesday.

"Although our research found penetration of these services isn't likely to exceed 10 percent of all subscribers by 2010, video/TV services are poised to become a significant contributor to carrier data ARPU while emerging as a hotbed for community-oriented interaction and interesting advertising experiments," said Lewis Ward, research manager in IDC's wireless and mobile communications program. "Broadband adoption of video/TV services is emerging as the cornerstone of growth in this market."

IDC cautioned, however, that network and business-model difficulties might hamper the adoption and growth of these services.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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