World Grid used to study protein folding

June 27, 2006

A team of U.S. scientists is using IBM's World Community Grid to be able to predict the structures of key proteins.

The researchers at New York University's Center for Comparative Functional Genomics are starting the second phase of a project designed to shed light on the role of proteins in diseases and offer pathways to cures.

The inter-institutional project will focus on key human and malaria proteins, merging the biomedical and computation fields in carrying out the study.

"Protein folding is a big problem; there are a large number of proteins and a lot of possible shapes/fold," explained NYU Assistant Biology Professor Richard Bonneau. "In spite of the difficulty, it is an important problem, at the heart of deciphering genomes. The shear amount of computer power needed to carry out this project makes the use of grid computing essential."

The grid consists of the computing power generated during the idle cycles of millions of computers.

The NYU researchers, in collaboration with scientists at Seattle's Institute for Systems Biology, will focus on cancer biomarkers -- proteins expressed during the early stages of several cancers.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Simpler interferometer can fine tune even the quickest pulses of light

Related Stories

Brick by brick—assembly of the measles virus

May 2, 2018

Researchers have been able to capture images of measles viruses as they emerge from infected cells, using state of the art cryo-electron tomography techniques. The new images will help with a greater understanding of measles ...

Tiny crystals could revolutionize structural biology studies

November 20, 2013

For structural biologists, the first step in determining a protein's precise molecular structure is often the hardest: coaxing the protein to grow into the orderly, three-dimensional crystals that are the starting material ...

In Alzheimer's, excess tau protein damages brain's GPS

January 19, 2017

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have discovered that the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients is caused by the accumulation of tau protein in navigational ...

Public computational biology web service gains popularity

June 16, 2014

"Many heads are better than one" is true for computers as well as humans. For years, scientists have connected computers into clusters and grids all over the world, crowdsourcing computational power to perform calculations ...

Recommended for you

Google braces for huge EU fine over Android

July 18, 2018

Google prepared Wednesday to be hit with huge EU fine for freezing out rivals of its Android mobile phone system in a ruling that could spark new tensions between Brussels and Washington.

EU set to fine Google billions over Android: sources

July 17, 2018

The EU is set to fine US internet giant Google several billion euros this week for freezing out rivals of its Android mobile phone system, sources said, in a ruling that risks fresh tensions with Washington.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.