AT&T documents released in NSA allegation

May 22, 2006

Wired News announced Monday that it has released the full text of a set of documents of AT&T's alleged participation with the National Security Agency.

The media outlet said that the documents were provided by a witness in the case over AT&T's participation in the agency's domestic wiretap operations.

According to Wired News Editor-in-Chief Evan Hansen in an article posted on the site, a file detailing AT&T's alleged participation in the operation remains unseen, with a judge denying requests from the Electronic Frontier Foundation and several news organizations to unseal the documents and make them public.

"As a result, we are publishing the complete text of a set of documents from the EFF's primary witness in the case, former AT&T employee and whistle-blower Mark Klein -- information obtained by investigative reporter Ryan Singel through an anonymous source close to the litigation," Hansen wrote. "The documents, available on Wired News as of Monday, consist of 30 pages, with an affidavit attributed to Klein, eight pages of AT&T documents marked 'proprietary,' and several pages of news clippings and other public information related to government-surveillance issues.

Hansen also said that it disagreed with AT&T's claims that the information would make the company suffer severe harm if it were released and are currently filing a motion to intervene in the case in order to request the court to unseal the court records.

The total of organizations filing motions increases which now includes the EFF, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Los Angeles Times, the San Jose Mercury News, the Associated Press and Bloomberg.

"In addition, we believe the public's right to know the full facts in this case outweighs AT&T's claims to secrecy," Hansen wrote.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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