Gold- and bronze-like paints that don't contain metal

Lustrous metallic paints are used to enhance the beauty of many products, such as home decorations, cars and artwork. But most of these pigments owe their sheen to flakes of aluminum, copper, zinc or other metals, which have ...

Spinach: Chemistry experiments show potential to power fuel cells

"Eat your spinach," is a common refrain from many people's childhoods. Spinach, the hearty, green vegetable chock full of nutrients, doesn't just provide energy in humans. It also has potential to help power fuel cells, according ...

Transforming e-waste into a strong, protective coating for metal

A typical recycling process converts large quantities of items made of a single material into more of the same. However, this approach isn't feasible for old electronic devices, or 'e-waste,' because they contain small amounts ...

Novel high-throughput screening method developed for ketones

Ketones are of great importance as building blocks in synthetic organic chemistry and biocatalysis. Most ketones cannot easily be quantitatively assayed due to the lack of visible photometric properties. Effective high-throughput ...

Bright early light of LEDs

LED lamps are lighting up the world more and more. Global LED sales in residential lighting have risen from five percent of the market in 2013 to 40 percent in 2018, according to the International Energy Agency, and other ...

The serendipitous discovery of a new green chemistry method

Dr. Petri Turhanen was working on a synthesis of a modified version of the biological molecule adenosine triphosphate (ATP), when he discovered that the cation exchange resin he was using was unintentionally producing another ...

Improving adhesives for wearable sensors

By conveniently and painlessly collecting data, wearable sensors create many new possibilities for keeping tabs on the body. In order to work, these devices need to stay next to the skin. In a study described in ACS Omega, ...

How rattlesnakes' scales help them sip rainwater from their bodies

During storms in the southwestern U.S., some rattlesnakes drink rain droplets from scales on their backs. This unusual behavior could help them survive in a desert environment with infrequent rain. Now, researchers have figured ...

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