Anti-Spoofing Bill Would Protect Caller ID

Apr 28, 2007

The "PHONE" act, now working its way through Congress, would prevent faking caller ID data for malice or profit.

As Washington Post blogger Brian Krebs points out, caller ID spoofing is currently legal, and has been used for a variety of untoward purposes.

But here comes Congress to the rescue with the "Preventing Harassment through Outbound Number Enforcement (PHONE) Act of 2007." The bill has passed the house and come out of committee in the Senate and is awaiting a vote by that body.

An earlier attempt last year to fill this security hole failed to make it all the way. There were definite problems with that law , such as not addressing the problem of calls from abroad.

The PHONE act would not ban all spoofing, just that done with the intent to defraud or impersonate another without their consent. This would seem to excuse, for example, large corporations that call from India but use their main US phone number for the caller ID. There is also an exception for law enforcement.

Copyright 2007 by Ziff Davis Media, Distributed by United Press International

Explore further: Students trust technology, but have concerns about privacy and robotics, poll shows

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Scots' inventions are fuel for independence debate

Sep 17, 2014

What has Scotland ever done for us? Plenty, it turns out. The land that gave the world haggis and tartan has produced so much more, from golf and television to Dolly the Sheep and "Grand Theft Auto."

White House backs use of body cameras by police

Sep 16, 2014

Requiring police officers to wear body cameras is one potential solution for bridging deep mistrust between law enforcement and the public, the White House said, weighing in on a national debate sparked by the shooting of ...

Chinese city creates cellphone sidewalk lane

Sep 15, 2014

Taking a cue from an American TV program, the Chinese city of Chongqing has created a smartphone sidewalk lane, offering a path for those too engrossed in messaging and tweeting to watch where they're going.

Coroner: Bitcoin exchange CEO committed suicide

Sep 15, 2014

A Singapore Coroner's Court has found that the American CEO of a virtual currency exchange committed suicide earlier this year in Singapore because of work and personal issues.

User comments : 0