Germany opts out of search engine project

Jan 03, 2007

The German government has confirmed that it is not participating in a multi-million dollar project to build a European search engine rivaling Google.

Participants said Germany pulled out because of a disagreement with France over the project's basic design, the International Herald Tribune said. French participants said they would continue to develop the search engine, possibly with funding assistance from the European Union.

German officials said they would concentrate on a smaller domestic research effort.

The project -- called Quaero, meaning "I seek" in Latin -- was introduced in April 2005 by French President Jacques Chirac former German chancellor Gerhard Schroder, as a European response to the U.S. search engine giant Google. But when Schroder was defeated at the polls and Christian Democratic Angela Merkel took office, the decision was made to abandon the project.

Germany and France initially discussed committing $1.3 billion to $2.6 billion to Quaero over five years. The project was to have been paid for by the French and German governments, with contributions from technology companies in the two countries.

One observer said he wasn't sure whether France alone could sustain momentum behind Quaero or secure the funding from the European Union.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: White House updating online privacy policy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ways eyed to make planes easier to find in ocean

Mar 12, 2014

For nearly five years, government and industry officials have been exploring ways to make it easier to find airliners and their critical "black boxes" that end up in the ocean. But their efforts are too late ...

Scientists assemble new space telescope

Mar 11, 2014

Scientists and engineers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center have begun to assemble and test the James Webb Space Telescope in advance of its 2018 debut.

World Wide Web turns 25 years old

Mar 09, 2014

Twenty-five years ago, the World Wide Web was just an idea in a technical paper from an obscure, young computer scientist at a European physics lab.

Recommended for you

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

3 hours ago

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

White House updating online privacy policy

7 hours ago

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

Net neutrality balancing act

Apr 17, 2014

Researchers in Italy, writing in the International Journal of Technology, Policy and Management have demonstrated that net neutrality benefits content creator and consumers without compromising provider innovation nor pr ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Under some LED bulbs whites aren't 'whiter than white'

For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, plastics, paper and fabrics to make whites look "whiter than white," but now, with a switch away from incandescent and fluorescent lighting, different ...

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

Continents may be a key feature of Super-Earths

Huge Earth-like planets that have both continents and oceans may be better at harboring extraterrestrial life than those that are water-only worlds. A new study gives hope for the possibility that many super-Earth ...

Researchers successfully clone adult human stem cells

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers, led by Robert Lanza, of Advanced Cell Technology, has announced that they have performed the first successful cloning of adult human skin cells into stem ...