Popular insecticide now in suburban waters

Oct 27, 2005

University of California-Berkeley researchers have, for the first time, detected high concentrations of a popular insecticide in suburban stream sediment.
The discovery is raising concerns about the insecticide's effects on aquatic life.

Pyrethroids, the active ingredient used in most home and garden insecticides, have been on the market for years. Although the compounds are considered potentially less harmful to humans than other insecticides, surprisingly little information is available about their long-term environmental impact, according to Donald Weston, an adjunct professor of ecotoxicology at the university.

His study was published online Oct. 19 by the American Chemical Society's journal, Environmental Science & Technology. A print version of the article is to appear in the journal's Dec. 1 issue.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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