University of Alberta program wins computer poker championship

Aug 08, 2006

The World Series of Poker wraps up later this week in Las Vegas, but a team of researchers from the University of Alberta has already won the de facto world poker championship for computers at the American Association of Artificial Intelligence. The event was held recently in Boston, Massachusetts.

The U of A computer program convincingly defeated all other programs in a two tournament format of one-on-one Texas Hold 'Em. The U of A poker "bot"' won every match it played and amassed by far the most virtual money of any competitor. A version the U of A program is included in the "Poker Academy" commercial software.

"Poker is a game that involves skill, chance, and many forms of uncertainty", said professor Jonathan Schaeffer of the Alberta team. "It is a great problem for Artificial Intelligence, and we stand to learn a lot from competitions like this".

"We've been writing good poker programs for many years", said Darse Billings, the lead designer for the Alberta team, "but we weren't overly confident, because there is still a lot of room for improvement".

Poker is particularly interesting to computer scientists, because it has many properties not found in other games.

"Poker is a nice well-defined problem for studying some truly fundamental issues, like how to handle deliberate misinformation, and how to make intelligent guesses based on partial knowledge", explained Billings. "Good solutions in this domain could have an impact in many other computer applications."

Source: University of Alberta

Explore further: A new app facilitates number and arithmetic learning in children with special educational needs

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Man versus machine poker re-match

Jul 01, 2008

Polaris, the University of Alberta poker playing computer program, is heading to Las Vegas for a re-match against humans.

Computer Program Can't Lose at Checkers

Jul 19, 2007

Game over. Computer scientists at the University of Alberta have solved checkers, the popular board game with a history that dates back to 3,000 B.C.

Recommended for you

BPG image format judged awesome versus JPEG

Dec 17, 2014

If these three letters could talk, BPG, they would say something like "Farewell, JPEG." Better Portable Graphics (BPG) is a new image format based on HEVC and supported by browsers with a small Javascript ...

Atari's 'E.T.' game joins Smithsonian collection

Dec 15, 2014

One of the "E.T." Atari game cartridges unearthed this year from a heap of garbage buried deep in the New Mexico desert has been added to the video game history collection at the Smithsonian.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.