Consumers cool to wireless image messaging

Jul 03, 2006

A pair of polls released this weekend show a relatively slow consumer response to the latest advanced wireless messaging features.

The Harris poll released in the United States and a survey of European consumers by Jupiter Research showed a perceived lack of need for video and picture messaging.

"Wireless marketers are facing a brick wall of resistance from many subscribers respecting these services," said Harris Vice President Joe Porus. "The wall is not cost, but a more fundamental question of need."

Porus, who likened conusmer attitudes toward image messaging as similar to owning a pet rock, said 73 percent of the U.S. consumers polled saw a need for such a service and 58 percent who said they had never tried them out. About 14 percent said they didn't know how to work the services.

Jupiter's Europe survey found that while text messaging remained highly popular, 68 percent said they weren't interested in paying extra to send video clips and still photos.

Jupiter also concluded that the supply of handsets capable of advanced messaging was not an issue.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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