HP, Dell win Israeli government tender

May 23, 2006

The Israeli government has reached a supply agreement with the Israeli Dell and HP computer distributors, the business magazine TheMarker reported Tuesday.

The government will be able to choose from several models of desktop and laptop computers from the two companies, along with one additional model by AcerPower, according to the report.

Hewlett-Packard is offering two of its desktop models to government users for a maximum price of $411. Laptop choices will include the Dell Latitude D420 -- a super-light computer not yet on the market -- and the Dell Latitude D820, for around $1,000 per unit, the magazine reported.

Another laptop option for the government will be HP's NX6125, the report said.

The deal also features favorable terms of service for the government, the report said. "HP and Dell undertook to solve serious technical problems within 24 hours, or to supply replacement computers. Service will take place at the customer premises and the supplier will have to install all the programs that were on the original computer," according to the report.

The magazine noted that despite Intel's long presence and large investment in Israel, the tender will not include Intel processors, instead opting for those by AMD.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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