Dinosaur named after Hogwarts School

May 22, 2006

A new dinosaur species -- Dracorex hogwartsia -- named in honor of author J.K. Rowling and her Harry Potter books, went on display Monday in Indianapolis.

The newly discovered, 66-million-year-old dragon-like dinosaur's name comes from the Latin words draco (meaning dragon), rex (meaning king), and hogwartsia (after the fictional Hogwarts School of Witchcraft & Wizardry created by Rowling).

"The naming of Dracorex hogwartsia is easily the most unexpected honor to have come my way since the publication of the Harry Potter books!" wrote Rowling. "I am absolutely thrilled to think that Hogwarts has made a small (claw?) mark upon the fascinating world of dinosaurs."

The nearly complete skull of the previously unknown dinosaur species was discovered by three friends during a fossil collecting trip in South Dakota and then donated to The Children's Museum of Indianapolis.

When it was brought to the museum for cleaning and studying, it was little more than a box of parts. It took two years to glue the many fragments and restore the skull, museum officials said.

The formal announcement of the name came Monday during the seventh annual Federal Fossil Conference held in Albuquerque, N.M.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: New hadrosaur noses into spotlight

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

New hadrosaur noses into spotlight

Sep 19, 2014

Call it the Jimmy Durante of dinosaurs – a newly discovered hadrosaur with a truly distinctive nasal profile. The new dinosaur, named Rhinorex condrupus by paleontologists from North Carolina State Univer ...

Militants threaten ancient sites in Iraq, Syria

Sep 19, 2014

For more than 5,000 years, numerous civilizations have left their mark on upper Mesopotamia—from Assyrians and Akkadians to Babylonians and Romans. Their ancient, buried cities, palaces and temples packed ...

New branch added to European family tree

Sep 17, 2014

The setting: Europe, about 7,500 years ago. Agriculture was sweeping in from the Near East, bringing early farmers into contact with hunter-gatherers who had already been living in Europe for tens of thousands ...

User comments : 0