'Levytator': Scientist unveils world's first freeform curved escalator (w/ Video)

Sep 30, 2010

Jack Levy, an Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering at City University London, has developed and patented the 'Levytator', and is now seeking to take it to market.

Architects will be able to create escalators in any shape they want, even freeform curves, thanks to the first significant rethink of escalator design since the ‘moving stairway’ was invented in 1897.

A system known as the 'Levytator' has been developed by Jack Levy, an Emeritus Professor of at City University London. Unlike traditional designs, where redundant steps move underneath those in use, the Levytator utilises a continuous loop of curved modules, which can follow any path upwards, flatten and straighten out, and descend once more, all with passengers onboard.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.
A video of a working model and computer simulation.

The system can be arranged in any configuration - as a DNA-esque double helix in a science museum, for example - and also offers several practical advantages at a cost that is similar to a conventional unit.

"As all of the steps can be accessed from above, maintenance can be carried out much more easily," says Levy. "It also means that no excavation is required when installing the Levytator. This could be particularly useful in the heritage sector, where the system could be placed on top of a grand staircase in a listed stately home, providing better access for elderly and disabled visitors, but not destroying the fabric of the building."

Explore further: Hendersons introduce hoverboard and a future beyond wheels

Provided by City University London

4.7 /5 (3 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Engineering the world's fastest swimsuit

Feb 28, 2008

A highly specialised computer modelling technique developed at The University of Nottingham has been instrumental in the design of a revolutionary new swimsuit which is now being hailed as the fastest in the world.

Recommended for you

Tablets, cars drive AT&T wireless gains—not phones

2 hours ago

AT&T says it gained 2 million wireless subscribers in the latest quarter, but most were from non-phone services such as tablets and Internet-connected cars. The company is facing pricing pressure from smaller rivals T-Mobile ...

Twitter looks to weave into more mobile apps

2 hours ago

Twitter on Wednesday set out to weave itself into mobile applications with a free "Fabric" platform to help developers build better programs and make more money.

Blink, point, solve an equation: Introducing PhotoMath

3 hours ago

"Ma, can I go now? My phone did my homework." PhotoMath, from the software development company MicroBlink, will make the student's phone do math homework. Just point the camera towards the mathematical expression, ...

Google unveils app for managing Gmail inboxes

3 hours ago

Google is introducing an application designed to make it easier for its Gmail users to find and manage important information that can often become buried in their inboxes.

User comments : 0