Volcanoes wiped Neanderthals out, research suggests

Sep 30, 2010 By Kevin Stacey
Astronaut photo of ash cloud from Mount Cleveland, Alaska, USA. Image: NASA

New research suggests that climate change following massive volcanic eruptions drove Neanderthals to extinction and cleared the way for modern humans to thrive in Europe and Asia.

The research, led by Liubov Vitaliena Golovanova and Vladimir Borisovich Doronichev of the ANO Laboratory of Prehistory in St. Petersburg, Russia, is reported in the October issue of .

“[W]e offer the hypothesis that the Neanderthal demise occurred abruptly (on a geological time-scale) … after the most powerful volcanic activity in western Eurasia during the period of Neanderthal ,” the researchers write. “[T]his catastrophe not only drastically destroyed the ecological niches of Neanderthal populations but also caused their mass physical depopulation.”

Evidence for the catastrophe comes from Mezmaiskaya cave in the Caucasus Mountains of southern Russia, a site rich in Neanderthal bones and artifacts. Recent excavations of the cave revealed two distinct layers of that coincide with large-scale volcanic events that occurred around 40,000 years ago, the researchers say.

Geological layers containing the ashes also hold evidence of an abrupt and potentially devastating . from the two layers reveal greatly reduced pollen concentrations compared to surrounding layers. That’s an indication of a dramatic shift to a cooler and dryer climate, the researchers say. Further, the second of the two eruptions seems to mark the end of Neanderthal presence at Mezmaiskaya. Numerous Neanderthal bones, , and the bones of prey animals have been found in the geological layers below the second ash deposit, but none are found above it.

The ash layers correspond chronologically to what is known as the Campanian Ignimbrite super-eruption which occurred around 40,000 years ago in modern day Italy, and a smaller eruption thought to have occurred around the same time in the Caucasus Mountains. The researchers argue that these eruptions caused a “volcanic winter” as ash clouds obscured the sun’s rays, possibly for years. The climatic shift devastated the region’s ecosystems, “possibly resulting in the mass death of hominins and prey animals and the severe alteration of foraging zones.”

ENTER MODERN HUMANS

Anthropologists have long puzzled over the disappearance of the and the apparently concurrent rise of . Was there some sort of advantage that helped early modern humans out-compete their doomed cousins? This research suggests that advantage may have been simple geographic location.

“Early moderns initially occupied the more southern parts of western Eurasia and Africa and thus avoided much of the direct impact of the … eruptions,” the researchers write. And while advances in hunting techniques and social structure clearly aided the survival of modern humans as they moved north, they also “may have further benefited from the Neanderthal population vacuum in Europe, allowing wider colonization and the establishment of strong source populations in northern Eurasia.”

While the researchers stress that more data from other areas in Eurasia are needed to fully test the volcanic hypothesis, they believe the Mezmaiskaya cave offers “important supporting evidence” for the idea of a volcanic extinction.

Explore further: Everglades trail surveyed for cultural artifacts

More information: Liubov Vitaliena Golovanova, et al. “Significance of Ecological Factors in the Middle to Upper Paleolithic Transition.” Current Anthropology 51:5 (October 2010).

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SteveL
not rated yet Sep 30, 2010
Location, location, location. Species survival, or failure to survive can be that simple.
getgoa
1 / 5 (3) Sep 30, 2010
The bible already says the flood wiped man out? I don't think this research outweighs how many years the bible has been in use?

For example the online bible drbo.org is dated 354 a.d. unless they were doing research back then about this the bible is more credible that a flood wiped out this species.

It also makes sense when neanderthals did mate with humans that it symbolized Cain and Abel and then Noe, the two breaks in the bible.
jsa09
not rated yet Sep 30, 2010
@getgoa I am not sure if your tongue is firmly planted in your cheek or not. I think you are joking but it is hard to tell. But hey if most of the neanderthals were wiped out by volcanoes and other hominids expanded territory at the same time that would add competition and may have made it difficult for the population to recover.
Skeptic_Heretic
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 06, 2010
@getgoa I am not sure if your tongue is firmly planted in your cheek or not.
No, he's really that brainwashed.

@getgoa, before you spout your bible nonsense, you may want to actually read it in its entirety. Pay special attention to the spot where it says bats are birds to see the rammifications of the Biblical "science" content.

The volcanic hypothesis is a strong one. Very interesting research.

frajo
1 / 5 (1) Oct 06, 2010
Pay special attention to the spot where it says bats are birds to see the rammifications of the Biblical "science" content.
That's not really an argument as the word "bird" (rsp. its Hebrew and Greek analogues in the original texts) at those times had different semantics than nowadays.

Somewhat like the "butterfly" which is not a fly, as everybody knows.
(Whith the most lyrical Greek analogue "petalouda", "flying flower". Not being a flower, of course.)
Skeptic_Heretic
3 / 5 (2) Oct 07, 2010
That's not really an argument as the word "bird" (rsp. its Hebrew and Greek analogues in the original texts) at those times had different semantics than nowadays.

Somewhat like the "butterfly" which is not a fly, as everybody knows.
(Whith the most lyrical Greek analogue "petalouda", "flying flower". Not being a flower, of course.)
The hebrew and greek analogues show a distinct division between what a bat and a bird are. Only within the confines of religion are animals classed by "kind" (flying, 4 legged, lizard, swimming, two legged, human)