Scientists redate Neanderthal fossils

January 5, 2006

Scientists say two Neanderthal fossils excavated from Vindija Cave in Croatia in 1998 may be 3,000-4,000 years older than originally thought.

An international team of researchers says the two Neanderthals are between 32,000 and 33,000 years old and perhaps slightly older.

In 1998, the fossils had been radiocarbon dated to 28,000-29,000 years ago.

Since that time, however, the increasing application of direct radiocarbon dating to late Neanderthal and early modern human fossils in Europe has greatly altered perceptions of the chronological relationships between Neanderthals and modern humans during the time that the latter spread westward across Europe, the study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences said.

Refinements in the sample purification techniques for the radiocarbon dating bone and teeth are also helping to provide more accurate dates for important fossil specimens.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Neanderthals died out earlier than originally believed

Related Stories

Neanderthals died out earlier than originally believed

May 10, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- According to a newly released report in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a newly refined method of radiocarbon dating has found that Neanderthals died off much earlier than originally ...

Dating of beads sets new timeline for early humans

September 12, 2013

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers led by Oxford University has new dating evidence indicating when the earliest fully modern humans arrived in the Near East, the region known as the Middle East today.

New evidence on the role of climate in Neanderthal extinction

September 12, 2007

The mystery of what killed the Neanderthals has moved a step closer to resolution after an international study led by the University of Leeds has ruled out one of the competing theories – catastrophic climate change – ...

Largest group of fossil humans are Neanderthals after all

June 13, 2012

(Phys.org) -- The world's largest known sample of fossil humans has been classified as the species Homo heidelbergensis but in fact are early Neanderthals, according to a study by Prof Chris Stringer of the Natural History ...

Recommended for you

Scientists solve puzzle of turning graphite into diamond

February 23, 2017

(Phys.org)—Researchers have finally answered a question that has eluded scientists for years: when exposed to moderately high pressures, why does graphite turn into hexagonal diamond (also called lonsdaleite) and not the ...

New gene for atrazine resistance identified in waterhemp

February 23, 2017

Waterhemp has been locked in an arms race with farmers for decades. Nearly every time farmers attack the weed with a new herbicide, waterhemp becomes resistant to it, reducing or eliminating the efficacy of the chemical. ...

Vast luminous nebula poses a cosmic mystery

February 23, 2017

Astronomers have found an enormous, glowing blob of gas in the distant universe, with no obvious source of power for the light it is emitting. Called an "enormous Lyman-alpha nebula" (ELAN), it is the brightest and among ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.