Video lambasting Google on privacy hits Times Square

Sep 03, 2010
A video cartoon featuring Google's chief Eric Schmidt (pictured) giving away ice cream to snoop on children aired on a giant screen in Times Square on Thursday as a privacy group continued to hound the Internet giant. A cartoon version of Google boss was shown cruising a residential neighborhood in an ice cream truck, spying on children and disclosing their parents' Internet browsing habits.

A video cartoon featuring Google's chief giving away ice cream to snoop on children aired on a giant screen in Times Square as a privacy group continued to hound the Internet giant.

Consumer Watchdog took its gripes with to the center of Manhattan on Thursday, where it paid to have a "Don't be evil?" animated clip shown on a "Jumbotron" screen above the masses coursing through Times Square.

A cartoon version of Google chief executive was shown cruising a residential neighborhood in an ice cream truck, spying on children and disclosing their parents' Internet browsing habits.

"We're satirizing Schmidt in the most highly-trafficked public square in the nation to make the public aware of how out of touch Schmidt and Google are when it comes to our privacy rights," said Watchdog president Jamie Court.

The snippet displayed as an advertisement in Times Square was from a video clip posted online at insidegoogle.com, a website run by Watchdog.

"We like ice cream as much as anyone, but we like privacy even more," Google said in response to an AFP inquiry regarding the video.

"That's why we provide tools for users to control their privacy online, like Google Dashboard, Ads Preference Manager, Chrome incognito mode and 'off the record' Gmail chat."

The California-based Internet titan said that information about its privacy tools can be found online at google.com/.

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User comments : 3

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random
not rated yet Sep 03, 2010
When will people realize that we've crossed the threshold. This is the 21st century: privacy is a thing of the past.
random
not rated yet Sep 03, 2010
When will people realize that we've crossed an irreversible threshold into an information economy? Privacy is now a thing of the past and we will never get it back, no matter how much we try. In an information economy, personal information becomes far too valuable to hoard. We can't stop the seekers from finding our information, but what we can do is exploit the economy to make a profit from selling our privacy. This way at least, everybody wins, a little.
jjoensuu
not rated yet Sep 05, 2010
"to make a profit from selling our privacy"

Thanks Einstein. And how do YOU actually make a profit from this ongoing-privacy-breach? Or do you work for Google and make a profit from other peoples data?