Peregrine's 'Soliton' observed at last

Aug 23, 2010
Peregrine's 'Solition' observed at last
A figure showing a calculated Peregrine solition upon a distorted background. This illustrates how such extreme wave structures may appear as they emerge suddenly on an irregular surface such as the open ocean. The destructive power of such a steep nonlinear wave on the ocean can be easily imagined.

(PhysOrg.com) -- An old mathematical solution proposed as a prototype of the infamous ocean rogue waves responsible for many maritime catastrophes has been observed in a continuous physical system for the first time.

The Peregrine 'Soliton', discovered over 25 years ago by the late Howell Peregrine (1938-2007), an internationally renowned Professor of Applied Mathematics formerly based at the University of Bristol, is a localised solution to a complex partial differential equation known as the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE).

The Peregrine solution is of great physical significance because its intense localisation has led it to be proposed as a prototype of ocean rogue waves and also represents a special mathematical limit of a wide class of periodic solutions to the NLSE. 

Yet despite its central place as a defining object of nonlinear science for over 25 years, the unique characteristics of this very special nonlinear wave have never been directly observed in a continuous physical system - until now.

An international research team from France, Ireland, Australia and Finland report the first observation of highly localised waves possessing near-ideal Peregrine soliton characteristics in the prestigious journal, .

The researchers carried out their experiments using light rather than water, but were are able to rigorously test Peregrine’s prediction by exploiting the mathematical equivalence between the propagation of nonlinear waves on water and the evolution of intense light pulses in

By building on decades of advanced development in fibre-optics and ultrafast optics instrumentation, the researchers were able to explicitly measure the ultrafast temporal properties of the generated soliton wave, and carefully compare their results with Peregrine’s prediction. 

Their results represent the first direct measurements of Peregrine soliton localisation in a continuous wave environment in physics. In fact, the authors are careful to remark that a mathematically perfect Peregrine solution may never actually be observable in practice, but they also show that its intense localisation appears even under non-ideal excitation conditions. 

This is an especially important result for understanding how high intensity may form in the very noisy and imperfect environment of the open ocean. 

The findings also highlight the important role that experiments from optics can play in clarifying ideas from other domains of science.  In particular, since related dynamics governed by the same NLSE propagation model are also observed in many other systems such as plasmas and Bose Einstein Condensates, the results are expected to stimulate new research directions in many other fields.

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8/24/2010: This is a corrected version of the article.

Explore further: How did evolution optimize circadian clocks?

More information: The paper is available to view via the following URL: dx.doi.org/10.1038/NPHYS1740

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User comments : 19

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Nephrops110
Aug 23, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
sams
3.8 / 5 (10) Aug 23, 2010
The term is 'soliton', not 'solition'. Note also the thousands of dupes on Google of this mistake. Did noone even read the abstract of the original research?
LariAnn
4.1 / 5 (9) Aug 23, 2010
Did noone even read the abstract of the original research?


'Soliton' is indeed the correct term, but I believe "none" is the word you were looking for, not "noone".
Jarek
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 23, 2010
There are also successful approaches to model single particles (mesons, baryons) as solitons (so called skyrmion models)...
So maybe all of them are just solitons and so we should search for a field which structure of solitons correspond well to known menagerie of particles and their behavior?

Natural extension of quantum phase - ellipsoid field (between too abstract skyrmions and too simple optical vertices) seems to fulfill these requirements - excitations comes in 3 spin 1/2 families, simplest charged particle has to have spin, further excitations correspond to mesons and baryons which can join into nucleus-like constructions, their natural interactions are two sets of Maxwell's equations: for electromagnetism and gravity (4th section of http://arxiv.org/pdf/0910.2724 )
barakn
4.4 / 5 (7) Aug 23, 2010
Did noone even read the abstract of the original research?


'Soliton' is indeed the correct term, but I believe "none" is the word you were looking for, not "noone".
"Noone" is a common misspelling of the phrase "no one," not of the word "none."

Noumenon
3.9 / 5 (64) Aug 23, 2010
� ever is uneven any tenttalking but never was not even one tenttalkst unever, bey quadrate. Mean, all tenttalks are always without theory because with practum is also not the real tenttalk �


What!?
barakn
4.4 / 5 (7) Aug 23, 2010
Genastropsychicallst appears to be a Dutch blogger that doesn't speak a scrap of English but consistently spams Physorg with these messages straight from a Dutch to English translator in a lame attempt to attract visitors to his blog.
Noumenon
3.9 / 5 (64) Aug 23, 2010
Did noone even read the abstract of the original research?


'Soliton' is indeed the correct term, but I believe "none" is the word you were looking for, not "noone".
"Noone" is a common misspelling of the phrase "no one," not of the word "none."



You didn't need to put the word none in quotes, and the comma and period should have been outside the quotes.
Noumenon
3.9 / 5 (63) Aug 23, 2010
Genastropsychicallst appears to be a Dutch blogger that doesn't speak a scrap of English but consistently spams Physorg with these messages straight from a Dutch to English translator in a lame attempt to attract visitors to his blog.


I just checked out his "blog", looks like an insane amount of copy-and-pasting words from other sources,... odd.
Bob_B
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 23, 2010
@ Noumenon
I thought when a word in quotes ends a sentence then the period does belong in the quotes?!?

Beware the Syntax attacks!
Husky
3 / 5 (2) Aug 23, 2010
thats like chirping with lasers
PhysicsLver21
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 23, 2010
Did noone even read the abstract of the original research?


'Soliton' is indeed the correct term, but I believe "none" is the word you were looking for, not "noone".
"Noone" is a common misspelling of the phrase "no one," not of the word "none."



You didn't need to put the word none in quotes, and the comma and period should have been outside the quotes.


actually commas and periods are placed inside of quoatation marks...
Adriab
4.3 / 5 (6) Aug 23, 2010
Did noone even read the abstract of the original research?


'Soliton' is indeed the correct term, but I believe "none" is the word you were looking for, not "noone".
"Noone" is a common misspelling of the phrase "no one," not of the word "none."



You didn't need to put the word none in quotes, and the comma and period should have been outside the quotes.


actually commas and periods are placed inside of quoatation marks...

That depends on a lot of rules. Furthermore, these rules differ between British English and American English.
Noumenon
Aug 23, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
d44x
3 / 5 (3) Aug 23, 2010
@ Noumenon
I thought when a word in quotes ends a sentence then the period does belong in the quotes?!?

Beware the Syntax attacks!


Actually you could replace "?!?" with an interrobang: ‽
d44x
3 / 5 (2) Aug 23, 2010
@ Noumenon
I thought when a word in quotes ends a sentence then the period does belong in the quotes?!?

Beware the Syntax attacks!


Actually you could replace "?!?" with an interrobang (well you'd be able to, but Physorg report an error if you try - come of Physorg accept the interrobang!)
Ethelred
3.8 / 5 (6) Aug 23, 2010
actually commas and periods are placed inside of quoatation marks...


Which is often silly at best. If I write a sentence that "quotes someone" internally the period should come after the quotes just I am doing here. If I am quoting an entire sentence than the period DOES belong inside the quotes. And if someone that does grammar for a living disagrees with me on this then they need to get real, instead of insisting on Good Grammar, no matter how much it destroys the sense or scan of the sentence.

Genastropsychicallst has already been banned once. Perhaps it is taking a page from the MultiNamed AWITSBS spammer. Who was very kind in making an empty post. He didn't even claim that AWITSBS explains English Grammar. NOTHING explain English Grammar adequately.

Ethelred
Caliban
2.7 / 5 (3) Aug 23, 2010
Do I forsee a new understanding of sunspots/solar flares, CMEs as a result of this observation?
Nyloc
3 / 5 (2) Aug 24, 2010
I think "Genastropsychicallst" is a rogue wave, himself. Language is a sea of ideas and words are the waves. Genastropsychicallst is but a Peregrine Event which has now been mathematically been proven to occur eventually. Like the open ocean, few see such events, but the internet provides the perfect vantage point to witness one propagate. Interrobang if you will, if comment you must.

And THAT'S how I'm attempting to bring this discussion BACK ON TOPIC! ;-)
Ravenrant
5 / 5 (3) Aug 29, 2010
Don't you people recognize a new word when it's coined? Solition is short for soliton solution.
Palli
not rated yet Aug 30, 2010
@ Noumenon
I thought when a word in quotes ends a sentence then the period does belong in the quotes?!?

Beware the Syntax attacks!


Actually you could replace "?!?" with an interrobang (well you'd be able to, but Physorg report an error if you try - come of Physorg accept the interrobang!)


interrobang? sounds like porn slang :D