Toward a new generation of superplastics

Jul 21, 2010
A substance made from natural clay (shown), the material used to make pottery, may be spinning its way toward use as an inexpensive, eco-friendly replacement for a compound widely used to make plastic nanocomposites.

Scientists are reporting an in-depth validation of the discovery of the world's first mass producible, low-cost, organoclays for plastics. The powdered material, made from natural clay, would be a safer, more environmentally friendly replacement for the compound widely used to make plastics nanocomposites. A report on the research appears in ACS' journal Macromolecules.

Miriam Rafailovich and colleagues focused on a new organoclay developed and patented by a team of scientists headed by David Abecassis.

The scientists explain that so-called quaternary amine-treated organoclays have been pioneering in the field of plastics nanotechnology. Just small amounts of the substances make plastics flame retardant, stronger, and more resistant to damage from and chemicals. They also allow plastics to be mixed together into hybrid materials from plastics that otherwise would not exist.

However, quaternary amine organoclays are difficult to produce because of the health and environmental risks associated with quaternary amines, as well as the need to manufacture them in small batches. These and other disadvantages, including high cost, limit use of the materials.

The new organoclay uses resorcinol diphenyl (which is normally a flame retardant), to achieve mass producible organoclays which can be made in continuous processing. In addition these organoclays are cheaper, generate less dust, and are thermostable to much higher temperatures (beyond 600 degrees Fahrenheit). This clay has also been proven to be superior for flame retardance applications. In addition, unlike most quaternary amine based organoclays, it works well in styrene , one of the most widely used kinds of plastic.

Explore further: Video: The chemistry of blue jeans, the pants that changed the world

More information: "The Role of Surface Interactions in the Synergizing Polymer /Clay Flame Retardant Properties", Macromolecules.

Related Stories

UMass Amherst Scientists Create Fire-Safe Plastic

May 30, 2007

Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have created a synthetic polymer—a building block of plastics—that doesn’t burn, making it an attractive alternative to traditional plastics, many of which are ...

Scientists de-polymerize polymers

Jun 26, 2007

Japanese scientists have created a process that breaks down certain plastics, allowing the chemicals to be reused to make new higher-quality plastic.

Recommended for you

NETL invents improved oxygen carriers

Feb 24, 2015

One of the keys to the successful deployment of chemical looping technologies is the development of affordable, high performance oxygen carriers. One potential solution is the naturally-occurring iron oxide, ...

Novel electrode boosts green hydrogen research

Feb 20, 2015

Scientists from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) have developed a novel reference electrode, and are working with hydrogen energy system manufacturer ITM Power to aid the development of hydrogen production ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Jigga
3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 21, 2010
Clay is composed of tiny flat flakes, which can bind organic molecules. When pair of such flakes is connected with long chains of organic molecules, you'll get supramolecular compounds with many interesting properties, for example hydrogels, which can solidify large amount of water.

http://news.cnet....4-1.html

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.