Related topics: bacteria · nutrients

New nanoparticles aid sepsis treatment in mice

Sepsis, the body's overreaction to an infection, affects more than 1.5 million people and kills at least 270,000 every year in the U.S. alone. The standard treatment of antibiotics and fluids is not effective for many patients, ...

Self-regulation of an enzyme with critical cellular functions

The lab of Kathy Gould, Louise B. McGavock Professor and professor of cell and developmental biology, used a multi-disciplinary approach that included structural biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology to investigate ...

Root symbiosis is regulated through nutrient status of plants

Phosphorus is one of the most important nutrients for plants. Among other functions, it is needed to create substances for the plant's immune system, for the healthy development of seeds and for root growth. A team of researchers ...

The oldest mineralized sponges in the world found in Ciudad Real

An international and multidisciplinary piece of research involving the participation of Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) concludes with the discovery of the mineralised fossil remains of the oldest sponges in the world—530 ...

page 1 from 19

Phosphate

A phosphate, an inorganic chemical, is a salt of phosphoric acid. In organic chemistry, a phosphate, or organophosphate, is an ester of phosphoric acid. Organic phosphates are important in biochemistry and biogeochemistry or ecology. Inorganic phosphates are mined to obtain phosphorus for use in agriculture and industry. At elevated temperatures in the solid state, phosphates can condense to form pyrophosphates.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA