Microsoft's Kinect to cost $150, on sale in November

Jul 20, 2010
Microsoft employee's demonstrate a new game that utilizes the Kinect for the new Xbox 360 console at a Microsoft press briefing in June 2010 in Los Angeles, California. Microsoft announced Tuesday that its new gesture-sensing system for the Xbox 360 videogame console, Kinect, will cost 150 dollars and go on sale on November 4.

Microsoft announced Tuesday that its new gesture-sensing system for the Xbox 360 videogame console, Kinect, will cost 150 dollars and go on sale on November 4.

Kinect uses a 3-D camera and motion recognition software to let people play videogames using natural and voice commands instead of hand-held controllers.

Kinect was developed by under the code name Project Natal and unveiled at the the (E3) last month in Los Angeles.

No price was revealed at the time but retailers had begun offering the device for pre-ordering a month ago.

Microsoft said "Kinect for " will sell for 149.99 dollars and will include the Kinect Sensor and the videogame "Kinect Adventures," which features a river raft ride through an obstacle course.

It said the Kinect Sensor will work with the 40 million Xbox 360s already sold worldwide.

Microsoft also announced that a four-gigabyte Xbox 360 console will include the Kinect Sensor and "Kinect Adventures" and sell for 299 dollars.

It said additional games are available for 49 dollars each including "Kinectimals," "Kinect Sports," and "Kinect JoyRide."

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FullyAutoMagic
not rated yet Jul 20, 2010
I'm going to guess this will not succeed. To set the stage, this is a method of catching up to the motion sensing tech of the Wii and now PS/3. As a Wii owner I've seen what has become from "motion plus" an add on technology to increase recognition of force and can say with no uncertainty that M$ will face a similar issue with developer support and end user acceptance. If they can come up with the software (read: games) that take advantage of it across the board, they might make it, if not this will just be another piece of history.