Sanyo launches first rice bread cooker

Jul 14, 2010
A woman displays the world's first cooker that can turn rice grains into bread. The machine -- dubbed "GOPAN" by Japanese electronics maker Sanyo -- can mill a cup of rice grains into rice flour, then mixes it with water, gluten, yeast and other ingredients to bake a loaf of bread in four hours.

Japan's consumer electronics maker Sanyo has launched the world's first cooker that can turn rice grains into bread -- an innovation that it hopes will be a hit across Asia.

The machine can mill a cup of rice grains into rice flour, then mixes it with water, gluten, and other ingredients to bake a loaf of in four hours, said.

The machine is named "GOPAN" in Japan -- coined from "gohan", meaning cooked rice, and "pan", Spanish for bread. Sanyo will start exporting it to other Asian countries next year after its Japanese launch in October.

"We are eagerly working to export this to other Asian countries, mainly China and Southeast , which share the culture of growing rice," said company spokeswoman Liu Yingying.

The machine would retail between 50,000 and 60,000 yen (560-670 dollars).

Wheat-free bread is good for people allergic to the grain, Sanyo said, noting that the machine can also operate without using gluten, which is taken from wheat and helps dough to rise.

Sanyo argued that another benefit would be that in Japan the cooker would increase rice consumption and change people's , helping increase the country's low food self-sufficiency ratio.

Japan, the world's second-largest economy, now produces only 40 percent of its food and buys almost all its wheat, corn and soy beans from overseas.

The country grows enough rice for domestic consumption, thanks to heavy trade protection, but annual consumption of the staple per person has halved since the 1960s as people's diets have diversified.

The market for "home bakery", or home-use bread-making machines, has boomed in Japan in the recent years, with shipments rising 30.7 percent in 2009 from the previous year to 438,000 units, according to industry data.

Explore further: EA tests subscription video game service for Xbox One

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Food For Life spelt bread is recalled

Mar 19, 2008

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the voluntary recall of Food For Life brand spelt grain bread due to a labeling error.

Panasonic completes Sanyo acquisition

Dec 21, 2009

(AP) -- Panasonic Corp. said Monday that it had taken majority control of Sanyo Electric Co., officially forming one of the world's largest electronics makers.

Arkansas rice farmers file a lawsuit

Aug 30, 2006

A group of Arkansas rice farmers has filed a state lawsuit against Bayer CropScience and Riceland Foods Inc., concerning genetically modified rice.

Capturing the True Value of Rice

Apr 22, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Appreciation for rice continues to grow as the U.S. population diversifies. Now, a series of rice utilization workshops -- cosponsored by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and USA Rice Federation ...

Recommended for you

A smart wristband for nocturnal cyclists

Jul 29, 2014

Five EPFL PhD students have developed a wristband that flashes when the rider reaches out to indicate a turn. Their invention was recognized at a European competition.

Lenovo's smart glasses prototype has battery at neck

Jul 28, 2014

China's PC giant Lenovo last week offered a peek at its Google Glass-competing smart glass prototype, further details of which are to be announced in October. Lenovo's glasses prototype is not an extreme ...

Sapphire talk enlivens guesswork over iPhone 6

Jul 27, 2014

Sapphire screens for the next iPhone? Sapphire is second only to diamond in hardness scratch-proof properties, used in making LEDs, missiles sensors, and on screens for luxury-tier phones. Last year, the ...

Startup offers elderly an Internet key to family links

Jul 27, 2014

Two grandmothers mystified by computer tablets have inspired a French-Romanian startup to develop an application and service to help the elderly stay in touch with their relatives through the Internet.

User comments : 0