T.25 City Car makes debut

Jun 28, 2010
T.25 City Car

Gordon Murray Design showed today for the first time its T.25 City Car at Oxford University as part of the Smith School's World Forum on Enterprise and the Environment validating a low-carbon approach to transportation. The T.25 represents a major breakthrough in city car design in the areas of weight, footprint, safety, usability and efficiency.

Gordon Murray Design's pioneering vehicle packaging and lightweight design offers solutions to multiple urban mobility problems, such as congestion and parking concerns, while at the same time its unique iStream reduces full lifecycle CO2 damage and increases production efficiencies.

"Our transportation sector is hugely dependent on and we need to de-fossilise our economy as quickly as possible," said Sir David King, Founding Director of the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment. "The T.25 and iStream manufacturing processes are clear examples of what's possible in low-carbon transportation."

The T.25 car program can support a variety of power trains and fuels. First markets are likely to be in Europe and Asia.

T.25 City Car

"The iStream process used to produce the T.25 is a complete re-think on high volume materials, as well as the manufacturing process and offers a significant reduction in CO2 emissions over the lifecycle of the vehicles produced using it, compared with conventional ones," said CEO Gordon Murray. "The simplified assembly process means that an assembly plant can be designed to be 20% of the size of a conventional factory. This could reduce capital investment in the assembly plant by approximately 80%."

Gordon Murray Design was established in 2007 to develop an innovative and disruptive automotive manufacturing technology trademarked iStream. The design and prototyping of the T.25 city was central to both the development and validation of iStream.

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