Laser Phosphor Display (LPD) television - it's all done with mirrors

Jun 24, 2010 by Lin Edwards report

(PhysOrg.com) -- Californian company Prysm has unveiled a high definition television with a "laser phosphor display" based on their patented method of using lasers reflected off a bank of mirrors to excite pixels on the television screen in a similar way to cathode ray tubes.

The laser phosphor display (LPD), called the TD1, was unveiled at InfoComm earlier this month. The first generation version consists of a rectangular glass screen 63 centimeters on the diagonal. Tiny patterns of phosphors are layered on the inside surface of the glass (or polymer), and these emit red, green or blue light when excited by a soft UV laser, to produce brilliant, high quality images. Since the phosphors are extremely close to the surface no image filtering is needed. The display can also be modified to suit specific viewing needs by using special coatings or substrates.

The solid-state laser diodes (similar to those in Blu-ray players) are mounted behind the screen and point up at bank of tiny, rapidly moving mirrors, rather like those used in laser printers. The mirrors reflect the laser light across the screen to produce the necessary number of image lines and create the picture. The resultant images have no motion blur or flicker.

The processor managing the laser varies the light intensity and turns the laser on and off, which means that when the display is dark the lasers are turned off to further reduce and increase the lifespan of the display.

The design results in a display that is currently 36 centimeters thick, but which has a greatly reduced power consumption a quarter that of LCDs and only one tenth of plasma televisions. The sets can be built with existing technology and there is no requirement for clean rooms in the manufacture of the screens, which cuts the expense considerably.

The TD1 does not suffer the problem of low brightness, which is suffered by rear projection sets. It also has the advantage that the displays are highly configurable and can be stacked seamlessly to create supersized high-resolution video walls of almost any size or shape. According to Prysm, the brightness and color range achieved exceeds or LED technologies, and the viewing angle is almost 180˚. The fast response time of 240 Hz and the 1.6 mm dot pitch also both exceed competing technologies such as LED.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

Prysm’s vice president of panel development and manufacturing, Patrick Tan, pointed out the fact that its technology has almost no requirement for new components gives the company a great advantage. All components, including the phosphors, mirrors and lasers are widely available, which makes development time short and reduces the time before production can be ramped up.

Prysm says it is dedicated to what it calls “ecovative” technology that is eco-friendly throughout its manufacture. As well as greatly reduced power consumption, the TD1 does not contain toxic components, has no consumables, and generates little heat.

Prysm says its HDTV will be competitive with LCD and plasma televisions within three to five years.

Explore further: Reflected smartphone transmissions enable gesture control

More information: www.prysm.com/

Related Stories

Samsung Develops First 70-inch LCD TV Panel

Aug 21, 2006

Samsung Electronics has developed the first 70-inch LCD panel for use in the consumer TV market. Currently, the largest LCD TV screen size is 65 inches. The company will unveil its 70-inch LCD HDTV at the ...

Recommended for you

Oculus unveils new prototype VR headset

14 hours ago

Oculus has unveiled a new prototype of its virtual reality headset. However, the VR company still isn't ready to release a consumer edition.

Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

21 hours ago

The interstitial pressure inside a tumor is often remarkably high compared to normal tissues and is thought to impede the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents as well as decrease the effectiveness of radiation ...

Tim Cook puts personal touch on iPhone 6 launch

22 hours ago

Apple chief Tim Cook personally kicked off sales of the iPhone 6, joining in "selfies" and shaking hands with customers Friday outside the company's store near his Silicon Valley home.

Team improves solar-cell efficiency

Sep 19, 2014

New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular ...

Calif. teachers fund to boost clean energy bets

Sep 19, 2014

The California State Teachers' Retirement System says it plans to increase its investments in clean energy and technology to $3.7 billion, from $1.4 billion, over the next five years.

User comments : 11

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

ShotmanMaslo
1 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2010
wow! Looks like all-in-one perfect display technology.
what are the disadvantages?
Squirrel
3 / 5 (2) Jun 24, 2010
what are the disadvantages?
Read "a display that is currently 36 centimeters thick"
Royale
not rated yet Jun 24, 2010
the thickness is one i could think of. (unless you're upgrading from rear projection). Also, they're using glass, which means this thing will be heavy. (No wall mounting). I like the low power/high brightness aspects though, and since i have yet to buy an HD set maybe I'll wait to see how this goes.
JamesThomas
4.3 / 5 (3) Jun 24, 2010
Considering the exponential growth in technical knowledge and improvements, in two years when this product is ready for homes, both the weight and thickness will likely be significantly reduced and other yet unknown improvements made. Looks to be a really great product. I congratulate them.
Chef
1 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2010
Hopefully we can keep the manufacturing in the US. I really hate how our government keeps driving away the manufacturing of American products, and we so need the jobs here. Kudos for the development though. Now you just need to get it to 5" or less in thickness.
pauljpease
5 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2010
Hopefully we can keep the manufacturing in the US. I really hate how our government keeps driving away the manufacturing of American products, and we so need the jobs here. Kudos for the development though. Now you just need to get it to 5" or less in thickness.


I'm not clear on this point...is it the government, or corporate greed that drives jobs out of the US? Presumably these are falsifiable hypotheses. I guess ultimately it is the government, since they could make it unprofitable to import foreign products. I assume your thinking is that government taxes local businesses so they must ship jobs oversees? Either way, as long as there are taxes they will favor production either inside US or overseas...hard to make a tax/trade policy that is EXACTLY perfectly balanced. Also, having no government isn't really an option. Interesting to think about though.
AnonymousSquid
not rated yet Jun 24, 2010
Today's disadvantage: Their building block: one tile is 320x240, 20x10". To configure yourself a 1080p display today, it would take 6x5 tiles. That would take 120x50"sq area. Considering one tile is 58lbs and consume 30 W, you'd have a 1740 lbs, 900 watts display.

Maybe in 2-3 years!

Currently, this is for industry applications, not for the general consumer.

http://www.prysm....al-specs
nevdka
1 / 5 (1) Jun 25, 2010
This is a prototype, a proof of concept. It doesn't look like a production model, just showing what they can do. I wouldn't be surprised if one of the existing TV makers bought them out, or at least started licensing the technology. They also say it will be competitive with LCD and Plasma in 3-5 years, and I remember hearing that about SED TVs 3-5 years ago as well...
AngryMoose
not rated yet Jun 25, 2010
This would be a great way to replace the cinema screens we currently have, would be amazing to see a display this sharp at cinema scales.
AnonymousSquid
not rated yet Jun 25, 2010
This is a prototype, a proof of concept. It doesn't look like a production model, just showing what they can do.


The TD1 is not a prototype nor a proof of concept. It is a product commercially available. You could have looked it up on their website before posting non sense.
Satviewer2000
not rated yet Jun 27, 2010
Hopefully we can keep the manufacturing in the US. I really hate how our government keeps driving away the manufacturing of American products, and we so need the jobs here. Kudos for the development though. Now you just need to get it to 5" or less in thickness.


It's not the government that should be responsible for keeping jobs in America. I'm not sure how you can "keep jobs in America" when the American salary is 10 to 100x that of foreign workers. American unions would eventually demand even higher wages. How can any company sell a DVD player for example, instead of $50 (if manufactured in Asia), versus $500 or even $5000 if made in the USA under Union driven wage demands? Don't they teach Economics 101 in school anymore?