Conn. AG: Google gathered public Wi-Fi data to map

Jun 09, 2010 By EVERTON BAILEY JR. , Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- Connecticut's attorney general says Google has informed his office that it collected data over the state's public wireless networks in 2008 for its mapping service.

Attorney General Richard Blumenthal said in a Tuesday press conference that he would continue pressing the search engine company to find out what's been done with the data gathered for its feature.

A Google spokesperson confirmed to The Associated Press that data was gathered from Connecticut two years ago.

Blumenthal says it could give Google access to personal e-mails, passwords and web browsing histories, though he has no reports of any problems.

Last month, acknowledged it had mistakenly collected data over public Wi-Fi networks in more than 30 countries.

Missouri's attorney general and authorities in Germany and have also launched separate investigations.

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gwrede
not rated yet Jun 09, 2010
I don't understand why Google doesn't come up with a reason for collecting data. I mean, they hardly are collecting it for something truly sinister, right?

I definitely don't think they were interested in people's emails or passwords. Even if they didn't already have the emails and passwords of tens of millions of Gmail users!

What might be interesting is statistical differences in where people surf using WIFI or land lines. But I imagine even that data could be compiled with less political danger.