Microsoft shutters Bing shopping rebate program

Jun 04, 2010

(AP) -- Microsoft is shutting down a program that gave online shoppers rebates when they found items through Bing search.

The cashback program started in May 2008. Microsoft Corp. was hoping cashback would help lure more people to its search engine.

But despite its efforts, Microsoft remains a distant third in search behind Inc. and Inc. Having a bigger audience is appealing to advertisers, and Google's dominance in search has been extremely lucrative for that company.

says in a blog post that the cashback program didn't attract as many people as the software maker had hoped.

Cashback offers will end on July 30. People who have earned rebates have a year to redeem them.

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