Toshiba LCD Panel Zooms In-and-Out By Bending It (w/ Video)

Jun 02, 2010 by John Messina weblog
At the SID 2010 Toshiba demonstrated their LCD panel that can be bent to zoom in-and-out of displayed images. Credit: Toshiba Corp.

(PhysOrg.com) -- Toshiba has come up with a method of zooming in-and-out of images by just bending the display. All you need to do is bend the thin flexible panel and the image will zoom in or out accordingly.

Toshiba Corp demonstrated this at the SID 2010 which is the largest international conference on display technologies.

At the conference, demonstrated zooming in-and-out of an aerial photograph of Google Earth displayed on the screen by bending the LCD panel. This little demonstration was drawing the attention of many engineers who attended the conference.

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The LCD panel has located at the end of the backlight unit. By bending the sensor the resistance value changes thereby causing the zooming in-and-out effect. In order to achieve this with the LCD panel, manufactured a thin backlight unit that can be bent to a curvature radius of 50mm, boasting an edge-lighting LED backlight unit whose light guide plate is as thin as 0.4mm.

The LCD panel screen size measures 8.4 inches and has a resolution of 800 x 600 pixels (SVGA). The thickness of the glass substrate used for the LCD panel is 0.1mm.

How useful this bendable LCD panel will be in applications has yet to be seen. Bendable LCD panels have been around for a while but this is the first bendable LCD panel I have come across that zooms in-and-out of images by bending the display.

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User comments : 6

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Sonhouse
not rated yet Jun 02, 2010
It's clear they can extend that technology to twisting motions also, for instance on that Google Earth page showing, twisting could make left to right, up or down, etc., motions also. There are many ways to develop this new technology.
Noumenon
1 / 5 (2) Jun 02, 2010
Oh crap, ....don't try it with your iPad !,... (wha, wha, wha, whawawawa)
Noumenon
1 / 5 (2) Jun 02, 2010
I think the iPad OS two finger 'pinch and spread' are more intuitive.
cmn
not rated yet Jun 03, 2010
@Noumenon -- that's what she said.
KronosDeret
not rated yet Jun 03, 2010
oh yes, the fingering jokes, black plague of apple fans.
gwrede
1 / 5 (1) Jun 10, 2010
If the flexible display did the zooming by itself, then that would be technology news. But now the only novelty is that they have a bend sensor in the display. The computer does the zooming. Gee.

Maybe the next rage will be a "Pane that Wakes Up when you grab it". Awesome. (The novelty being a temperature sensor in it. Unfathomably new.)

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