UN: new group helps promote broadband

May 10, 2010

(AP) -- The International Telecommunication Union has set up a group headed by Mexican billionaire Carlos Slim and Rwandan President Paul Kagame to help more countries get access to broadband connections.

The ITU says the group of 30 business and social leaders will work out strategies on how to achieve worldwide coverage of broadband networks and how to use them for health care services, education and environmental management.

The agency said Monday that governments should consider the high-speed networks as basic .

Broadband access has increased in particular for mobile phones in recent years. The ITU said it expects the number of mobile broadband subscriptions worldwide to exceed 1 billion this year.

Explore further: Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ericsson strong on broadband, mobiles

May 10, 2006

Strong demand for broadband worldwide and for mobile phones in developing countries is keeping the telecom industry strong, the head of Ericsson said.

Five billion people to use mobile phones in 2010: UN

Feb 15, 2010

The ranks of cell phone subscribers will swell to five billion people this year thanks to the growth of smartphones in developed nations and mobile services in poor nations, a UN agency said Monday.

Mobile broadband use to leap by 2015: Ericsson

May 05, 2010

The number of people using mobile broadband to access the Internet is expected to soar from around 400 million today to some 3.5 billion by 2015, Swedish telecommunications equipment giant Ericsson said on ...

Samsung to Showcase Mobile Broadband 4G Technology

Dec 04, 2006

Samsung Electronics is putting on an ambitious showcase of its latest telecommunication technologies at the ITU Telecom World 2006 being held in Hong Kong , China from December 4 to 8.

Recommended for you

Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

3 hours ago

Grappling with fast-changing technology, U.S. Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in ...

Hundreds in Mexico protest telecommunications law

3 hours ago

Hundreds of students and activists marched in Mexico's capital Tuesday to protest a telecommunications law being debated by the Senate that they say will allow the government to arbitrarily censor Internet content.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

Finalists named in Bloomberg European city contest

Amsterdam wants to create an online game to get unemployed young people engaged in finding jobs across Europe. Schaerbeek, Belgium, envisions using geothermal mapping to give households personalized rundowns of steps to save ...

Internet TV case: US justices skeptical, concerned

Grappling with fast-changing technology, U.S. Supreme Court justices debated Tuesday whether they can protect the copyrights of TV broadcasters to the shows they send out without strangling innovations in ...

Brazil passes trailblazing Internet privacy law

Brazil's Congress on Tuesday passed comprehensive legislation on Internet privacy in what some have likened to a web-user's bill of rights, after stunning revelations its own president was targeted by US ...

In the 'slime jungle' height matters

(Phys.org) —In communities of microbes, akin to 'slime jungles', cells evolve not just to grow faster than their rivals but also to push themselves to the surface of colonies where they gain the best access ...

New alfalfa variety resists ravenous local pest

(Phys.org) —Cornell plant breeders have released a new alfalfa variety with some resistance against the alfalfa snout beetle, which has ravaged alfalfa fields in nine northern New York counties and across ...