Regulators propose grant program for public safety

Feb 25, 2010

(AP) -- Federal regulators will recommend that Congress devote up to $16 billion over 10 years to pay for a nationwide wireless broadband network that would allow police officers, firefighters and other emergency workers to communicate with each other.

The will propose that lawmakers establish a $6 billion grant program to build the public safety network, plus a $6 billion to $10 billion grant program to operate and upgrade the network.

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said Thursday that the proposal will be part of the agency's national broadband plan, which is due to Congress next month and will lay out a roadmap for bringing high-speed Internet connections to all Americans.

The proposed public safety network would use wireless spectrum freed up by following last year's transition from analog to digital broadcasts.

Explore further: Scientists twist radio beams to send data: Transmissions reach speeds of 32 gigabits per second

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Caliban
1 / 5 (1) Feb 25, 2010
-And only PARTIALLY FUND the ongoing maintenance, which will, no doubt, be provided by private contractors at inflated rates.
And tell me how this separate network is to be any less vulnerable to disruption- by the selfsame forces that create the "emercency" that they need to coorsdinate "services" for- than the existing one. Is it to be constructed of "indestructibillium"?
This is at the very least a particularly heinous piece of porkbarrel legislation, and quite possibly far worse still.