US creates task force to crack down on IP crime

Feb 12, 2010
The US Justice Department announced the formation of a task force on Friday to crack down on intellectual property crime.

The US Justice Department announced the formation of a task force on Friday to crack down on intellectual property crime.

"The rise in intellectual property crime in the United States and abroad threatens not only our public safety but also our economic wellbeing," US Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement.

"The Department of Justice must confront this threat with a strong and coordinated response," Holder said.

"This task force will allow us to identify and implement a multi-faceted strategy with our federal, state and international partners to effectively combat this type of crime," he said.

The will coordinate IP enforcement efforts at the Justice Department, with international partners and with the office of the newly created Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator.

Former president George W. Bush created the position of "IP czar" in an October 2008 bill which also tightened civil and criminal laws.

The bill provided the Justice Department and FBI with more resources to fight IP crimes, which are estimated to cost US businesses as much as 250 billion dollars a year.

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Quantum_Conundrum
5 / 5 (1) Feb 12, 2010
The bill provided the Justice Department and FBI with more resources to fight IP crimes, which are estimated to cost US businesses as much as 250 billion dollars a year.


Eli Whitney invented the Cotton Gin. Guess what? He made zero off the idea. Why? Because nobody owns the right to concepts or science, and nobody should own those rights.

Does anyone "own" mathematics? No.

Does anyone "own" cosmology? No.

So what is different about "technology"? Nothing really.

Patenting is absurd.

You shouldn't be able to "own" a design, concept, or scientific law or formula.

Technology and algorithms are just like any other science. If you didn't make the discovery, odds are someone else would have eventually, why should you have the "ownership" of this information any more than the next person?
Roj
1 / 5 (1) Feb 12, 2010
Could Albert Einstein have bean inspired without the patent office, where he worked examining the brilliant inventions of his time?
Wha_wha_what
3.5 / 5 (2) Feb 12, 2010
You shouldn't be able to "own" a design, concept, or scientific law or formula.


It's easy to say that if you haven't invented anything.

The truth is it costs tens of millions of dollars to discover some of these designs and that investment can take years to be returned.

It's waaaay easier to reverse engineer something than to develop it, look at chinese knock-offs. When was the last time a good, new product came out of China?

Without patents, the incentive to develop new technology is greatly reduced. Why spend millions doing something when you can spend thousands copying someone else?
fourthrocker
not rated yet Feb 13, 2010
Typical of how stupid a government can be. I get 2 or 3 notifications every day of an inheritance or lotto winning. Scam artists and internet scams are ripping off regular (admittedly stupid) people of their life savings and ruining lives but the government creates a task force to help business. We don't have a 'by the people, for the people' government, we have a 'by the corporation, for the corporation' government that doesn't give a crap about people.
nevdka
not rated yet Feb 16, 2010
That $250 billion is bloated. These sort of numbers are usually from 'lost sales'. At the consumer end, pirated/counterfeit material is significantly cheaper than 'official' material.

Most people who pirate movies, TV shows and music online wouldn't pay the price the copyright owners want. If it wasn't free, they just wouldn't get it.

I'm not sure if the numbers for counterfeited material are similarly bloated. However, I don't see how a $10 Chinese knock-off of a $1000 handbag or jacket could count as a lost sale, or any sort of lost revenue.