Terra satellite captures cyclone Magda's Australian landfall

Jan 22, 2010
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument on NASA's Terra satellite saw Tropical Storm Magda making landfall at 01:35 UTC on January 22. Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team

When Cyclone Magda made landfall from Collier Bay at around 5 a.m. local time on January 22 in northern Australia, NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the storm. Magda is now dissipating rapidly over land in northern West Australia.

The , or MODIS instrument on NASA's provided a clear image of Tropical Madga as it continued making landfall at 01:35 UTC (09:35 a.m. local time/Australia). Local reports indicated that some buildings on the Kimberley coast were damaged, but there were no injuries as the storm came ashore. Magda crossed the coast shortly before 5am (WST).

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology issued the "All clear" today for residents in or near Derby, including those in the Camballin community. The heaviest rain is located on the western half of the system, but those thunderstorms are weakening.

Magda was located inland in Western Australia near 17.4 degrees South and 124.4 degrees East at 8:00 p.m. WST (7 a.m. ET) today, January 22. It was moving south at 7 mph (11 kph) and had near 30 knots (34 mph/55 kph). The Australian Bureau of Meteorology said that "No further advices will be issued for this system."

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final advisory on the storm at 4 a.m. ET today (5 p.m. Australian WST), when the storm was about 395 nautical miles east-northeast of Port Hedland, Australia, near 16.9 South and 124.5 East.

The system is rapidly dissipating and will fizzle over interior Australia over the weekend.

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