S.Korean scientists develop walking robot maid

Jan 18, 2010
Mahru-Z (R), a robot developed by the Korea Institute of Science and Technology picks up a sandwich in Seoul. South Korean scientists have developed a walking robot maid which can clean a home, dump clothes in a washing machine and even heat food in a microwave. The institute took two years to develop Mahru-Z.

South Korean scientists have developed a walking robot maid which can clean a home, dump clothes in a washing machine and even heat food in a microwave.

Mahru-Z has a human-like body including a rotating head, arms, legs and six fingers plus three-dimensional vision to recognise chores that need to be tackled, media reports said Monday.

"The most distinctive strength of Mahru-Z is its visual ability to observe objects, recognise the tasks needed to be completed, and execute them," You Bum-Jae, head of the cognitive robot centre at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology, told the Korea Times.

"It recognises people, can turn on microwave ovens, washing machines and toasters, and also pick up sandwiches, cups and whatever else it senses as objects."

The institute took two years to develop Mahru-Z, which is 1.3 metres (4.3 feet) tall and weighs 55 kilograms (121 pounds).

It could also work with an earlier maid robot called Marhu-M which moves on wheels, since both can be remotely controlled through a .

You claimed Mahru-Z as the most advanced robot in terms of mimicking human movements.

Apart from tackling chores, researchers say it could also be used in conditions too difficult or dangerous for humans. But for commercial use is some way away.

The science institute spends about about four billion won (3.5 million dollars) every year on research. It began receiving state funds for the project in 2006.

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User comments : 6

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larcencielle
5 / 5 (2) Jan 18, 2010
Good to hear that we're making strides in robot industries
baudrunner
3 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2010
Whenever I read articles about domestic robots I can't help but think that the main obstacle to seeing mass-produced maid/servant/slave robots that could almost pass the Turin test both in action and appearance is the subtle influence of social mores and standards. I mean, isn't the first thing that comes to mind a "real love doll" that can be user programmed to cook, do the housework and still provide companionship of a kind determined by the whims of its master? Is that or is that not a potentially offensive possibility? Should the manufacturers actually care what people do with their robots, and if so would it be ethical to censor a robot's potential? Lots of fodder for the mill here.

RayCherry
1 / 5 (1) Jan 18, 2010
Just wait 'til robots demand the vote. She looks like Rosie from The Jetsons.
truth1000
5 / 5 (1) Jan 19, 2010
censor a robots potential...lol
I dont think so...Larry Flint meets nanotech android...equals the ultimate internet porn experience and she'll do the dishes and mop the floor when its over....I don't see very many limits in the long run...other then the limits of the human imagination!
Buyck
5 / 5 (1) Jan 24, 2010
Household robots are coming very close now. Its only a couple of years from now and can go buy some one in the market. Lets say by 2020-2025. The progress in the robotic industrie and science is very hard these days.
droid001
1 / 5 (1) Jan 31, 2010
Do we really need $100k humanoid robots that pick up sandwiches ? I do not see any practical applications for that.
mpeppermint23
Mar 03, 2010
This comment has been removed by a moderator.