Stanford professor compares energy from Haiti earthquake to a nuclear blast (w/ Video)

Jan 14, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Anne Kiremidjian, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford, predicts that it could take Haiti 10 years to recover from the earthquake that devastated the island nation.

The island nation of Haiti was devastated by a 7.0-magnitude that struck on Jan. 12, 2010. One Haitian official told CNN that the capital, Port-au-Prince, "is flattened." Thousands of structures ranging from the Haitian National Palace to hospitals and homes stand in ruins.

Stanford University researchers study earthquakes, how they damage buildings and how buildings can be designed to resist the violent shaking seen in the Haitian tragedy.

In this video, Anne Kiremidjian, professor of civil and environmental engineering, explains why so many buildings collapsed in Haiti.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.


Explore further: Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Killer quake struck just below the surface

Jan 13, 2010

The quake that struck Haiti erupted just below the surface on a notorious fault where two plates of the Earth's crust jostle and grind, scientists said.

Why Haiti keeps getting hammered by disasters

Jan 13, 2010

(AP) -- When it comes to natural disasters, Haiti seems to have a bull's-eye on it. That's because of a killer combination of geography, poverty, social problems, slipshod building standards and bad luck, ...

US ports vulnerable to devastating earthquake damage

May 23, 2006

If a repeat of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake were to occur, and the Port of Oakland were so severely damaged that it took as long as two years to resume full operations, what would be the impact on the U.S. economy?

Recommended for you

Magnitude-7.2 earthquake shakes Mexican capital

Apr 18, 2014

A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday, sending panicked people into the streets. Some walls cracked and fell, but there were no reports of major damage or casualties.

User comments : 0

More news stories

China says massive area of its soil polluted

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

UN weather agency warns of 'El Nino' this year

The UN weather agency Tuesday warned there was a good chance of an "El Nino" climate phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean this year, bringing droughts and heavy rainfall to the rest of the world.

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...