Smarter control of electric vehicle batteries

Jan 14, 2010

Nanoelectronics technology is improving the way that batteries and motors in electric vehicles are controlled, giving them a longer range on each charge. 

Electric vehicles are fitted with one or several electric motors driven by energy stored in large batteries that may consist of thousands of small cells. These high-capacity batteries give current models of electric cars a range of up to 200 kilometres.

The EU’s E3Car project is studying how to utilise power as efficiently as possible in such vehicles. SINTEF Group, an independent research organisation in Scandinavia, is one of 33 participants in the project, which comprise vehicle manufacturers, automotive industry suppliers and research centres from all over Europe.

The project has taken up challenges on several fronts. Battery efficiency, higher and power and energy control make up one group of topics. The infrastructure required for rapid charging or systematic change of battery is another. And smart dynamic sensor-based monitoring, where nanoelectronics can provide real-time control, is a third field of research.

“SINTEF’s area is on the nanoelectronics side, and we are putting up expertise on and voltage convertors,” says project manager Ovidiu Vermesan of SINTEF ICT. Together with the Norwegian companies ElBil Norge and Think Global, the SINTEF project group is looking at power and energy control in what they call the cars of the future.

The E3Car project is looking to use microprocessors, ligic circuits and sensors that will continuously monitor voltage, current and temperature in the battery pack. Measurements of this sort will allow certain operations to be cut out and the energy used to power others. If a sensor exceeds its permitted range, for example, the battery pack can be disconnected in a millisecond.

“The battery voltage needs to lie around what the motor requires - 200 - 400 volts. But we can convert vehicle motors to operate at a lower voltage (100V), which would mean less risk in the event of fire or traffic accidents,” says Vermesan.

E3Car is the Largest European research project on the development of nanotechnology for . The project is still in its very first phase, and is intended to run until 2012, with a total budget of € 44 million.

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DGBEACH
not rated yet Jan 15, 2010
"The battery voltage needs to lie around what the motor requires - 200 - 400 volts. But we can convert vehicle motors to operate at a lower voltage (100V), which would mean less risk in the event of fire or traffic accidents,” says Vermesan.

THIS would mean that you would have to increase the gauge of the wiring from the batteries and to the motor(s), which would increase the weight of the vehicle, not to mention its cost.
A SMART power supply can maintain the voltage to the motors regardless of the battery's voltage, boosting it if necessary.
Michael7
not rated yet Jan 20, 2010
Hi,

Batteries and electric vehicles: http://www.sustai...sue.html
You’ll find all you need to know