Haier Exhibits A Wireless HDTV Video System at the 2010 CES (w/ Video)

Jan 13, 2010 by John Messina weblog
Haier 'completely wireless' TV
Wireless content is transferred by a system called Wireless Home Digital Interface (WHDI). Using a 5GHz frequency band it can transfer uncompressed 1080p 60Hz video to the TV.

(PhysOrg.com) -- Haier America Digital Products Group (Chinese company) demonstrated the first completely wireless 32 inch LCD TV that is powered wirelessly up to a distance of 1 meter (3.28 feet).

By using a coil that is approximately 1 foot by 1 foot in size, at the back of the TV set, 100 watts of electricity can be supplied at a distance up to 1 meter (3.28 feet).

Haier Exhibits A Wireless HDTV Video System at the 2010 CES (w/ Video)

TV images are displayed by using WHDI (Wireless Home Digital Interface), a high-speed communication standard for wirelessly transmitting high-definition images. This leaves the back of the TV completely wire free.

The WHDI uses a of 5 GHz which is the industry standard for WHDI technology developed by Amimon Ltd. By utilizing a bandwidth of 40 MHz, data rates up to 3 Gbps can be transmitted to transfer uncompressed 1080p 60Hz video to the TV; the maximum transmission range is one hundred feet.

The wireless power transfer technology, utilizing magnetic coupling, was developed by WiTricity Corp, a US base venture firm that was founded by an MIT professor in April 2007. Electricity is transferred through the use of two resonant devices of the same frequency. This enables the maximum power to be transferred.

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2010 CES: Haier features the "completely wireless HDTV"

ABI Research (Technology Market Research Company) said last year it expected 1 million installations will be performed by 2012. Currently WHDI is supported by 40 vendors, including Broadcom, LG, Intel, NEC, Panasonic, Samsung, Sony, Philips and Toshiba.

In 2010 and beyond we can expect to see manufactures experimenting with different . Until consumers start seeing the sets in stores, it's difficult to determine which manufactures will have the most innovative wire free HDTV's on the market.

Explore further: FINsix small-size laptop adapter uses special power platform

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Fazer
not rated yet Jan 13, 2010
Wireless power, yet no comments?

I wonder if this WiTricity company was started by the same professor whose team powered a 60 watt light bulb from across a room a year or two ago?

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