Skiff unveils e-reader for newspapers, magazines

Jan 04, 2010
People attend the 2009 International Consumer Electronics Show in 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada. US company Skiff released details Monday of its upcoming electronic reader, a device slightly bigger than Amazon's largest Kindle designed for reading newspapers and magazines in addition to books.

US company Skiff released details Monday of its upcoming electronic reader, a device slightly bigger than Amazon's largest Kindle designed for reading newspapers and magazines in addition to books.

The Skiff Reader features an 11.5 inch (29.2-centimeter) screen, about two inches (five cms) larger than that of the Kindle DX, and is also the thinnest e-reader to date at just a quarter of an inch (0.63 cms), according to Skiff.

Skiff, which is backed by US newspaper and magazine publisher Hearst Corp., said for the device, which weighs just over one pound (0.45 kilograms) will be provided by Skiff partner .

Skiff did not announce a price for the device, which will be available starting later this year in Sprint stores across the country and online.

Unlike the Kindle, which is geared mainly for book readers, Skiff said its device is the "first e-reader optimized for newspaper and magazine content."

"The Skiff Reader's big screen will showcase print media in compelling new ways," Skiff president Gilbert Fuchsberg said in a statement.

"This is consistent with Skiff's focus on delivering enhanced reading experiences that engage consumers, publishers and advertisers," he said.

Skiff said its black-and-white touchscreen e-reader will feature next-generation "metal foil" e-paper technology from LG Display.

It said the thin, flexible sheet of stainless-steel foil is a step up from the "fragile glass that is the foundation of almost every electronic screen."

The Skiff Reader will be displayed at the 2010 International (CES) which opens in Las Vegas later this week.

As print advertising revenue evaporates and circulation erodes, US newspaper and magazine publishers have been looking to carve out a future on the Internet and with e-readers and mobile devices.

Online advertising revenue has been disappointing, however, and advertisers and readers have been generally underwhelmed by the presentation of newspapers and magazines on e-readers and smartphones.

Skiff would provide advertising alongside newspaper or magazine articles -- a feature that is not currently offered by e-readers on the market such as the Kindle, which is tailored more to e-books than periodicals.

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Birthmark
not rated yet Jan 04, 2010
I'd love to have a technological device (all touch) yet with the same feel as the "old" stuff (a magazine, newspaper) where you can enlarge stories, play games without a pen or pencil (like the word puzzles and stuff), and become a bit more interactive just with multiple pages like a real magazine or newspaper.

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