Elpida Completes Development of 65nm XS Version 1-Gigabit DDR3 SDRAM

Dec 17, 2009

Elpida Memory, Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced that it had completed development of a 65nm XS extra-shrink version 1-Gigabit DDR3 SDRAM that is as cost-competitive as 50nm process memory devices.

In response to the slump in the DRAM market that has lasted since 2008, is taking a two-track R&D approach that focuses on conventional process migration and on layout innovations that reduce the cost of capital investment. Along with migrating to advanced processes such as 50nm and 40nm the company is developing shrunken chip versions through extensive use of existing ArF dry scanner equipment. As a result, a 65nm S shrink version was developed in 2008 and now a 65nm XS extra-shrink version has been completed.

The 65nm XS is a smaller version of the already shrunken 65nm S and delivers 25% more chips per 300mm wafer compared with its predecessor. In addition to its extremely small chip size the XS shortens the manufacturing process and helps to greatly reduce equipment costs through the use of ArF dry scanner equipment. Chips costs are comparable to 50nm process products.

The new 65nm XS version 1-Gigabit DDR3 SDRAM will target the PC and server market. Mass production is scheduled to begin in the first quarter of 2010.

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