Privacy watchdog files complaint against Facebook

Dec 17, 2009

(AP) -- A Washington-based privacy advocacy group has filed a complaint against Facebook over the social network's latest privacy changes.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center said Thursday it has asked the Federal Trade Commission to look into the changes Facebook has made to its users' privacy settings.

The changes, unveiled last week, include treating users' names, profile photo, gender and other data as publicly available information.

The group, EPIC, says the changes diminish user by disclosing personal information to the public that was previously restricted.

says it discussed the changes with regulators, including the FTC, before making them.

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