Watchdog: Facebook violates Canadian privacy law

July 16, 2009 By CHARMAINE NORONHA , Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- Canada's privacy commissioner says the online social networking site Facebook breaches Canadian law by keeping users personal information indefinitely after members close their accounts.

Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart released a report Thursday that also accuses Facebook of disclosing users personal information to developers who make software for the site and of collecting personal information of nonusers.

She says the account settings page describes how to deactivate accounts but not how to remove from Facebook's computer servers. She wants Facebook to remove personal data in deactivated accounts.

Stoddart gave Facebook a month to respond.

The commissioner could ask the Federal Court of to have her recommendations enforced.

Facebook issued a statement reiterating it was working on new privacy features.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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lengould100
not rated yet Aug 27, 2009
Igloos are not good for broadband
Hey, igloos are excellent for internet connections. The ice walls are very permeable to wifi, and the reduced size and complexity versus typical American castles makes intra-family connection much more common. They also are about as sturdy and long-lived as American structures.
lengould100
not rated yet Aug 27, 2009
though we worry they're threatened by global warming.

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