Design chosen for British 1,000 mph car (w/ Video)

Nov 25, 2009 by Lin Edwards weblog

(PhysOrg.com) -- A British team hoping to be the first to get a car to 1,000 mph (1,610 km/h) has made its final design selection. The six-tonne car, known as the Bloodhound, will be powered by a Eurofighter jet engine mounted above a hybrid rocket, and will be built in Bristol, UK.

The driver of the Bloodhound SSC (SuperSonic ), Andy Green, set the world land of 763 mph (1,228 km/h) in Thrust SSC in 2007. Green said he hoped the car would be ready to try to beat the record in 2011. The record attempts will be made in South Africa's Hakskeen Pan in the Northern Cape Province. Wing Commander Green, an RAF fighter pilot, said the pan is perfect because the surface of the dried-out lake can support the car but is soft enough to allow the titanium or carbon-reinforced aluminum wheels to sink perhaps one centimeter, which would give the car needed damping or compliance to help him to steer the car at lower speeds. (At higher speeds it steers more like a speedboat than a car.) The track will be 10 miles (16 km) long.

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More information: www.bloodhoundssc.com/

© 2009 PhysOrg.com

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User comments : 8

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WithOneT
not rated yet Nov 25, 2009
Great, but what is the point of traveling 1000 mph?
dtxx
1 / 5 (1) Nov 25, 2009
As soon as I he started pulling ahead I would have fired a few missles at him.
ThomasS
Nov 25, 2009
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Doug_Huffman
1 / 5 (1) Nov 25, 2009
Now we know why the Climate-gate documents were released, clearing the way for this carbon-footprint.
googleplex
not rated yet Nov 25, 2009
At least at that speed it cannot fly so no lift. However ballistic considerations enter play. Surface heating and supersonic shockwaves could rip it apart if a component fails.
I would want to run it via remote control a few times before strapping in the driver to go for the record.
RayCherry
not rated yet Nov 26, 2009
Why?

Nostalgia. Adventure. Advancement. Evolution. Inspiration. Hope.

For all of us
paulthebassguy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 26, 2009
I think they should build a road-car version that the general public can buy. Now that would be awesome.
acarrilho
not rated yet Nov 29, 2009
Great, but what is the point of traveling 1000 mph?


Getting from point A to point B really really fast.
frajo
not rated yet Nov 29, 2009
Great, but what is the point of traveling 1000 mph?
Getting from point A to point B really really fast.
Yes, if A and B are on the surface of the same dried-out lake.