New technology may cool the laptop, prof says (w/ Video)

Oct 29, 2009

Does your laptop sometimes get so hot that it can almost be used to fry eggs? New technology may help cool it and give information technology a unique twist, says Jairo Sinova, a Texas A&M University physics professor.

Sinova and colleagues from Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory, Institute of Physics ASCR, University of Cambridge and University of Nottingham have had their research published in the renowned journal .

Laptops are getting increasingly powerful, but as their sizes are getting smaller they are heating up, so how to deal with excessive heat becomes a headache, Sinova explains.

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"The crux of the problem is the way information is processed," Sinova notes. "Laptops and some other devices use flows of electric charge to process information, but they also produce heat.

"Theoretically, excessive heat may melt the ," he adds. "This also wastes a considerable amount of energy."

Is there a solution?

One approach may be found in Sinova's research - an alternative way to process information.

"Our research looks at the of electrons, tiny particles that naked eyes cannot detect," the Texas A&M professor explains. "The directions they spin can be used to record and process information."

To process information, Sinova says, it is necessary to create information, transmit the information and read the information. How these are done is the big question.

"The device we designed injects the electrons with spin pointing in a particular direction according to the information we want to process, and then we transmit the to another place in the device but with the spin still surviving, and finally we are able to measure the spin direction via a voltage that they produce," Sinova explains.

The biggest challenge to creating a spin-based device is the distance that the spins will survive in a particular direction.

"Transmission is no problem. You can think for comparison that if the old devices could only transmit the information to several hundred feet away, with our device, information can be easily transmitted to hundreds of miles away," he says. "It is very efficient."

Talking about its practical application, Sinova is very optimistic. "This new device, as the only all-semiconductor spin-based device for possible information processing, has a lot of real practical potential," he says. "One huge thing is that it is operational at room temperature, which nobody has been able to achieve until now. It may bring in a new and much more efficient way to process information."

Source: Texas A&M University

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User comments : 5

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gunslingor1
not rated yet Oct 29, 2009
Doesn't sound like he knows what's he's doing. He's still transporting electrons, whether they have a particular spin or not. So I don't see how any energy is concerved.
antialias
5 / 5 (1) Oct 29, 2009
Curently it takes many electrons for one bit of information to be passed on. With this every electron would pass on one bit of information.

Less electrons moved = less heat.
Krystoffr
not rated yet Oct 30, 2009
If a state of logic could be made accurate, without the excessive current that is used to saturate the transistor. Both Power Consumption and heat will be dramatically reduced.
Alexa
not rated yet Oct 31, 2009
..Less electrons moved = less heat...
It means higher noise/signal ratio, too. It's not problem to decrease currents in contemporary microprocessors. The problem is the noise of individual electrons, which becomes significant after then.
Alexa
not rated yet Oct 31, 2009
Spinotronic made easy: David Awschalom of UC-Santa Barbara describes, what spintronics is and why it is important.

http://www.youtub...bGq634yU