New Advance in Revolutionary 'Bullet Fingerprinting' Technique

Jul 12, 2009
This is an optical microscope image of a fingerprint on brass. Credit: University of Leicester

(PhysOrg.com) -- 'Bullet fingerprinting' technology developed at the University of Leicester in collaboration with Northamptonshire Police is now being advanced in new ways.

Dr John Bond, from Northamptonshire Police Scientific Support Unit and an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Leicester’s Forensic Research Centre developed- in collaboration with University scientists - a method to ‘visualise fingerprints’ even after the print itself has been removed.

The revolutionary technique was named last year as one of Time Magazine’s top 50 inventions of the year.

Now continuing work exploring this forensic technique in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Leicester is uncovering new ways of recovering from metal surfaces.

This is an optical microscope image of a fingerprint on brass. Credit: University of Leicester

Researcher Alex Goddard has uncovered a natural technique that he believes is so simple, which can explain why it has been overlooked until now.

The technique involves studying the chemical and physical interactions occurring between the metal and the fingerprint sweat deposit. Using advanced surface imaging techniques, such as an , nanoscale observations of fingerprinted brass samples can identify optimum conditions to promote the natural enhancement of the fingerprint, vastly improving their recovery rate. It has also proven that components of the sweat deposit survive washing and wiping of the surface.

Goddard explains, “Once a finger has touched the metal surface, a residue remains behind, this starts to react with the metal and an image of the fingerprint can be developed by use of elevated temperature and humidity, with the resultant image becoming a permanent feature on the surface of the metal.”

“Currently, fingerprint recovery from bullets is very low; less than 1 percent. This uses a natural process and even if it only leads to small increase in success rate, then that would be significant.

This is an optical microscope image of a fingerprint on brass. Credit: University of Leicester

“Previous recovery methods include applying powder to the material which can actually damage the evidence. This new technique promotes a naturally occurring process which does not involve adding anything to, or damaging, the evidence. Instead, it employs heat and humidity to promote the enhancement of the fingerprint image, there are also indications that it could be used after other techniques have failed, perhaps as a last resort.”

Dr John Bond said: "I am delighted that this research in the Chemistry Department is producing really interesting and useful results. This is an important area of and Northamptonshire Police is proud to be associated with the University. I look forward to further developments".

Alex Goddard recently presented his findings at the University of Leicester’s Postgraduate Research Festival.

Provided by University of Leicester (news : web)

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User comments : 3

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ArtflDgr
not rated yet Jul 13, 2009
add a bit of oxygen to the mix... duh..

finger prints mask areas and prevent or change rate of tarnish. so pick your oxydizers...

that means that fuming hcl in the bottom of the prep area (like with cyano acrylic), will oxydize the metal which when oppened will then be replaced by oxygen making the mtal turn black.


Walid
not rated yet Jul 13, 2009
can this be carried out on ancient brass ornaments
ArtflDgr
not rated yet Jul 13, 2009
no...

and here is why..

over time they have been polished.. if not, then they have years of finger prints over finger prints.

this would make any print quite noisy.

however, what do you think the outcome will be once this hits the press and some idiot thinks a bit?

again, like most of these things they are too dependent on ignorance. so they mostly just get teh bad criminals, while the better ones are not bothered with.