Time Warner CEO hints at online fees for magazines

May 29, 2009

(AP) -- One of the world's largest magazine publishers appears to be having second thoughts about giving away most of its articles on the Internet.

Time Warner Jeffrey Bewkes told an investor conference Friday that he doesn't think it makes much sense for to provide their content without a way to recover the production costs.

But Bewkes didn't say whether Time Warner's magazine group, which includes Time, People and Sports Illustrated, is considering charging fees for access to its Web sites.

Many publishers, particularly in the newspaper industry, are drawing up plans to charge Internet readers to help offset a steep decline in ad revenue.

Ad revenue in Time Warner's publishing division plunged 30 percent in the first quarter.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Facebook 'newspaper' spells trouble for media

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

AOL names former Google executive as CEO

Mar 12, 2009

(AP) -- An executive from Google Inc. is becoming the latest CEO of AOL, raising hopes that he will be able to turn around Time Warner Inc.'s struggling Internet unit.

AOL names yet another head of online ad business

May 01, 2009

(AP) -- AOL, the struggling Internet unit that Time Warner Inc. is likely to spin off, said Thursday that it will put a new executive in charge of its online advertising business - making him the fourth person to hold that ...

Recommended for you

Spotify prompts industry debates on streaming

4 hours ago

From board rooms in Japan to songwriter's rooms in Nashville, a debate is brewing in music industry circles about the financial and creative value of streaming music, even as its popularity and impact skyrocket.

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dirk_bruere
5 / 5 (2) May 29, 2009
Let me make a prediction - charging fees will cut readership by at least 70%, and hence advertising revenue also drop. It won't solve the problem.
ArkavianX
4 / 5 (1) May 29, 2009
No contest!
vika_Tae
not rated yet May 30, 2009
It does depress me, when these large, well established companies feel that they are so big, they can continue to cling to turn of last century business models, applied to the newer, paradigm shifting technologies.

As I have said before, all that will happen is a handful of people will subscribe to these sites, rewrite the news that appears - likely in aggregate from several of them, to remove bias - and then post online for free, on ad supported sites.

With a far smaller staff, and negligible overheads, these companies will take 70% of the audience the big sites used to have, and will be viable models for advertising supported news for some years to come.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.