Time Warner CEO hints at online fees for magazines

May 29, 2009

(AP) -- One of the world's largest magazine publishers appears to be having second thoughts about giving away most of its articles on the Internet.

Time Warner Jeffrey Bewkes told an investor conference Friday that he doesn't think it makes much sense for to provide their content without a way to recover the production costs.

But Bewkes didn't say whether Time Warner's magazine group, which includes Time, People and Sports Illustrated, is considering charging fees for access to its Web sites.

Many publishers, particularly in the newspaper industry, are drawing up plans to charge Internet readers to help offset a steep decline in ad revenue.

Ad revenue in Time Warner's publishing division plunged 30 percent in the first quarter.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Twitter admits to diversity problem in workforce

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

AOL names former Google executive as CEO

Mar 12, 2009

(AP) -- An executive from Google Inc. is becoming the latest CEO of AOL, raising hopes that he will be able to turn around Time Warner Inc.'s struggling Internet unit.

AOL names yet another head of online ad business

May 01, 2009

(AP) -- AOL, the struggling Internet unit that Time Warner Inc. is likely to spin off, said Thursday that it will put a new executive in charge of its online advertising business - making him the fourth person to hold that ...

Recommended for you

Study shows role of media in sharing life events

11 hours ago

To share is human. And the means to share personal news—good and bad—have exploded over the last decade, particularly social media and texting. But until now, all research about what is known as "social sharing," or the ...

UK: Former reporter sentenced for phone hacking

18 hours ago

(AP)—A former British tabloid reporter was given a 10-month suspended prison sentence Thursday for his role in the long-running phone hacking scandal that shook Rupert Murdoch's media empire.

Evaluating system security by analyzing spam volume

18 hours ago

The Center for Research on Electronic Commerce (CREC) at The University of Texas at Austin is working to protect consumer data by using a company's spam volume to evaluate its security vulnerability through the SpamRankings.net ...

Surveillance a part of everyday life

19 hours ago

Details of casual conversations and a comprehensive store of 'deleted' information were just some of what Victoria University of Wellington students found during a project to uncover what records companies ...

European Central Bank hit by data theft

20 hours ago

(AP)—The European Central Bank said Thursday that email addresses and other contact information have been stolen from a database that serves its public website, though it stressed that no internal systems or market-sensitive ...

Twitter admits to diversity problem in workforce

22 hours ago

(AP)—Twitter acknowledged Wednesday that it has been hiring too many white and Asian men to fill high-paying technology jobs, just like several other major companies in Silicon Valley.

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dirk_bruere
5 / 5 (2) May 29, 2009
Let me make a prediction - charging fees will cut readership by at least 70%, and hence advertising revenue also drop. It won't solve the problem.
ArkavianX
4 / 5 (1) May 29, 2009
No contest!
vika_Tae
not rated yet May 30, 2009
It does depress me, when these large, well established companies feel that they are so big, they can continue to cling to turn of last century business models, applied to the newer, paradigm shifting technologies.

As I have said before, all that will happen is a handful of people will subscribe to these sites, rewrite the news that appears - likely in aggregate from several of them, to remove bias - and then post online for free, on ad supported sites.

With a far smaller staff, and negligible overheads, these companies will take 70% of the audience the big sites used to have, and will be viable models for advertising supported news for some years to come.