Alaska volcano spews 25,000 feet-high ash plume

Apr 01, 2009

(AP) -- Observatory officials say Alaska's Mount Redoubt has spewed steam and ash up to 25,000 feet high.

Alaska Observatory geophysicist John Power says the volcano had been spewing about 15,000 feet into the air before it erupted Tuesday afternoon.

A broad layer of haze that could contain ash has extended from the Matanuska-Susitna Valley north of Anchorage to the Kenai Peninsula.

The eruption prompted Airlines to cancel 18 flights in and out of Anchorage, which is roughly 100 miles northeast of the volcano.

The volcano has been active since March 23. The last time it erupted was during a four-month period in 1989-90.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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LuckyBrandon
not rated yet Apr 01, 2009
ok so is there an update on this, or are they just repeating the 4th or 5th article written on it? There damn sure is nothing new here....it makes you think it blew again...

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